Jump to content


- - - - -

Ticket prices


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
26 replies to this topic

#21 Rosie

Rosie

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Leicestershire
  • Interests:Anything to do with music- playing the oboe, singing and composition.<br />Anything to do with musicals!

Posted 18 February 2007 - 06:47 PM

There's also the issue of how much the people working on the shows get paid. Obviously celebrity cast members get paid a fair amount, but what about ensemble, orchestra, back stage crew? I don't know exactly how much people get paid in these jobs, I've never asked, but the general opinion seems to be that its very low pay. These people have years of training behind them, they are skilled, talented, and have dedicated their lives to what they are doing, and for many of them there are no prospects of promotion. Yet they're still being paid pittance while producers are raking it in. Obviously this isn't the case with all shows, as I know many don't break even, but you only have to look at people like Andrew Lloyd Webber and David Ian for examples of when it does happen.

#22 Peter

Peter

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • Location:Bristol, UK

Posted 19 February 2007 - 01:54 PM

Can't speak for David Ian, but Andrew Lloyd Webber's wealth comes from his copywrites - having written the music, he is entitled to a payment from the London production, the Broadway production, the tours, Canada, Europe, Australia, amateur rights etc etc. Of the shows produced solely by RUG, I believe only Aspects of Love and Whistle down the Wind have made any money...

And pay in the performing arts isn't too bad, certainly not compared to what I do (which also required training and skill!), but the problem is that it's such an unstable industry that people may be out of work for months on end and need to support themselves through that period.

How was it that shows in the 'old days' could recoup with a few months of solid business, yet now have to run for years? Are they now costed using different financial models? Ot have expenses (wages, op costs, rent) increased substantially?
"Don't you DARE use 'party' as a verb in my shop!"

#23 Tintin

Tintin

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 463 posts

Posted 19 February 2007 - 08:10 PM

There was a time when I would go to the theatre in the West End frequently. Tickets were fairly cheap and I really did not mind taking a risk that the production might turn out to be disappointing. Nowadays I am not prepared to take that risk, and will only pay to see something if I have a reasonable idea that I will enjoy it.

I am very pleased that Matthew Winn has given such a clear explanation of the complicated financing system. However, if the general perception is that ticket prices are astronomical, apart from the use of discount organisations, the whole West End theatre is on a collision course. Whatever the reasons for the high pricing, the West End will just die out, apart from one or two blockbusters such as The Sound Of Music, which really is riding high on its television promotion.

The example from Haz really brings it home. Would the average family be willing to fork out that amount for a night out? One night out? Maybe on rare occasions, but going to the theatre on a regular basis, as so many of us would love to do, will sadly become a thing of the past. Put that alongside the costs of a family holiday.

And I bet the average young person would, if given the choice, rather spend their money on seeing a rock or pop show. And who could blame them, when so often the plays have small casts, little in the way of scenery, and offer very little that would tempt them along?

West End producers really need to think things out very carefully if they are to have any future.

#24 Blue

Blue

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 318 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 19 February 2007 - 09:01 PM

Perhaps they feel safe in their prices as the musicals are riding high at the moment and are generating substantial revenue for the companies involved.

#25 Haz

Haz

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1264 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 19 February 2007 - 09:07 PM

QUOTE(Tintin @ Feb 19 2007, 08:10 PM) View Post
There was a time when I would go to the theatre in the West End frequently. Tickets were fairly cheap and I really did not mind taking a risk that the production might turn out to be disappointing. Nowadays I am not prepared to take that risk, and will only pay to see something if I have a reasonable idea that I will enjoy it.


Tintin, I think that's actually a really valid point - there is a lot of objection to the number of revivals/Broadway transfers/film or book adaptations that make it into the West End and I think your point about seeing something that you reasonably expect to enjoy is very telling. The cost of tickets means that people wouldn't chance their luck on a show they know nothing about.. if you're going to spend 60 on a night out, you want to be damned sure you enjoy it! That's far more likely if it's a show based on a film you enjoy or a revival of something you've seen before.. It is perhaps, less certain with a show that has no 'backing' like that, that is thoroughly new. Therefore, new and perhaps smaller shows, do not get the backing.. and we end up with more and more 'blockbuster' musicals that in turn push ticket prices up even further!

Nightmare.

whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should

http://curtain-up.blogspot.com/

#26 Haz

Haz

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1264 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 19 February 2007 - 09:12 PM

QUOTE(Samantha @ Feb 18 2007, 06:12 PM) View Post
2)  Shows are deliberately setting prices knowing they will have to discount.  There are very few producers who can expect to sell out at face value (the obvious big hitters only), so the discounts they will be offering, showpairs, tkts, kids week, GITLT etc are actually considered when the prices are set.  I've had a producer say to me when we were setting up one show, if we set it at 40 top then at least we can hope to get 20-30 a ticket.  People believe the whole offers/deals promotions and makes them believe they are getting a deal, therefore more likely to buy than if that was their face value originally.


I just don't see this as a valid argument (on their part, not yours Samantha). If tickets were priced from 15-40, that's a far more reasonable range. I understand the logic of people feeling better for 'getting a deal' but if prices were lowered, there would be less deals and people would soon stop caring about that!

I imagine that the vast majority of people who visit the West End do not live in London.. therefore - whether they are travelling from within the UK or from overseas - they will likely come with a budget for their trip. If they save 20 on a theatre ticket they may not necessarily spend that difference IN the theatre, but they will more than likely spend it elsewhere in London, so the economy as a whole would not suffer.

whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should

http://curtain-up.blogspot.com/

#27 Guest_teaboy_*

Guest_teaboy_*
  • Guests

Posted 20 February 2007 - 08:05 PM

If 'buy-one-get-one-free' deals didn't increase purchaces why would ALL shops use them?

People ARE happier when they 'get a deal', and WILL buy something/see a show simply because of the offer.

The producers of shows know this, and understand the bredth of potential audience available. Some people will ONLY buy top-price seats (as can be seen by other comments on this thread), some are happy with a lower-price, lower-quality full-price seat. Others will buy top-price seats at a discount, either through TKTS, special offers, or by booking as a Group. By having a slightly higher 'full-price' a producer can 'subsidise' Group rates, offers, etc.

Although useful, Matthew's 'financial advice' is (as he stated!) overly-simplistic. Not all tickets are sold at the same price.

Also, money from the bar and merchandise does not always go to the producer.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users