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Bad Behaviour At A Show


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#1741 Lynette

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 12:22 AM

I wouldn't take a 10 yr old to chorus line. Where did they get that age from? If a kid knows the Matilda book or indeed the movie, then the stage musical is ok and lots of kids by 8 know either one or both. But I think some parents are a bit ambitious. Saw 'play' of 'don't let the pigeon drive the bus' this afternoon and there were teenies there, too young to get it. I know some tourists have to take kids with to a show cos can't leave them in hotel but then maybe they could choose something more suitable.

#1742 Jon

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:07 AM

I think for most family musicals, 7+ is the recommended age and its only if a child is used to going to the theatre, I think a lot of those shows like Room on a Broom, We're Going on a Bear Hunt would be much more suitable for younger children and get them used to theatre.

Off topic but I've never understood why any parent would bring a child to an art gallery, I like art galleries but I could see a child finding them very boring.

#1743 mallardo

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:39 AM

There was a boy of perhaps 8 or 9 sitting behind me at Othello the other night.  I didn't hear a peep from him, a tribute to him and his parents, but I can't imagine what he made of that 3 and a quarter hour endurance test.  He probably liked the soldiers and the guns.
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#1744 armadillo

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:20 AM

View Postmallardo, on 22 April 2013 - 05:39 AM, said:

There was a boy of perhaps 8 or 9 sitting behind me at Othello the other night.  I didn't hear a peep from him, a tribute to him and his parents, but I can't imagine what he made of that 3 and a quarter hour endurance test.  He probably liked the soldiers and the guns.
  I imagine he just quietly fell asleep...

#1745 Lou105

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:39 AM

View Postarmadillo, on 22 April 2013 - 06:20 AM, said:

I imagine he just quietly fell asleep...

As did the approx 7 year old boy I saw at Macbeth. Dread to think what he saw in his dreams!

#1746 xanderl

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:26 AM

View PostJon, on 22 April 2013 - 05:07 AM, said:

Off topic but I've never understood why any parent would bring a child to an art gallery, I like art galleries but I could see a child finding them very boring.

Well, fair enough if the parents want to go to the gallery, but they need to get the kids not to treat the gallery as a playground! Saw this recently at the Barbican's Duchamp exhibition, a small child racing around the exhibits while his parents looked on adoringly, until an attendant intervened.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#1747 Kathryn2

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:48 AM

View Postcraftymiss, on 20 April 2013 - 09:11 PM, said:

There should be no food at the theatre regardless of where you buy it. It's not beyond the realms of possibility to go for 2.5hrs without food. Eat before you go to the theatre or eat after, not during. I don't care if it's a McFlurry, theatre bought ice cream or a picnic (as per a tweet of mine from long past) it's really NOT necessary.  Heck I love my food but I can manage a few hours without it.

That's perfectly possible if you live in London, of course. Not so much if you're finishing work at 6pm and heading into town for a show, then getting a train home again.

A night at the theatre means I don't make it home until midnight if I rush off to the train station straight after the curtain call. I try to get away from work early enough to grab a bite to eat beforehand, but if not I have to snack during the INTERVAL. FFS, people. What you eat during the interval really shouldn't be a problem, you're not disturbing anyone then - at least, no more than people drinking from the bar do.



#1748 craftymiss

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 08:06 AM

View PostKathryn2, on 22 April 2013 - 07:48 AM, said:

That's perfectly possible if you live in London, of course. Not so much if you're finishing work at 6pm and heading into town for a show, then getting a train home again.

A night at the theatre means I don't make it home until midnight if I rush off to the train station straight after the curtain call. I try to get away from work early enough to grab a bite to eat beforehand, but if not I have to snack during the INTERVAL. FFS, people. What you eat during the interval really shouldn't be a problem, you're not disturbing anyone then - at least, no more than people drinking from the bar do.

I often leave work get the train for a 1hr 20min journey into London. I either plan before hand and take a sandwich to eat on the train or I pick something up from a shop & eat on the hoof on the way there if I'm unable to factor time for a sit down meal.  If not I try to get something to eat prior to the train home.  I usually arrive home at 0130 so could potentially have gone over 12 hours without food, this isnt a hardship if I get to see a show. Im not being a martyr here but showing that someone even with my capacity to eat can do it.

Regarding what people eat during an interval, it can be a problem if they are eating warm pasties and smelly sausages (you'd have to scroll back many tweets to see what I mean by that) as it makes me want to gag. If I was on a tube I could move away unfortunately being confined to a specific seat means moving isn't possible. I also think drinks (other than water) should not be allowed in the auditorium, the smell of cheap but overpriced wine is really something that should be confined to the bar.  I actually just bloody wish people would stop treating the theatre as if they are sat at home on their sofa with their feet up, eating a takeaway and chatting to their family. If that's what you want from a night then stay at home, it's simple.

#1749 craftymiss

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 08:18 AM

View PostCatqc, on 21 April 2013 - 07:10 PM, said:

At Matilda on Friday I had very young children in front and behind me, all talking constantly. In the middle of 'Quiet' the ones behind me decided it was time to open whatever food they had and did so amidst much arguing. The little boy in front of me also found it too loud so spent a lot of time thrashing around with his hands over his ears. Now I understand that you have to expect young children, especially at something like Matilda, but maybe teach them to be quiet first? I dont know if Im being unreasonable, what do people think?

I have 3 children who are now aged 18, 16, 15 and apart from my eldest who isn't a keen theatre goer they have all been attending theatre since they were 2 or 3 (pantos and kids shows were where they cut their theatre going teeth).  They know how to behave and will sit & enjoy a performance better than many adults, they understand how expensive seeing a West End show is and that people do not go to listen to others chatting, rustling, fidgitting etc, if you demonstrate how to behave by your own behaviour then children learn. Of course going to Matilda on a matinee or during the school holidays is going to be noisier than a mid week evening show of The Audience (well I'd like to think so) and I think most of us can appreciate their enthusiasm afterall these children are the future audiences of British theatre, however, a theatre is not a babysitting service where you take your little 7 year old to see Macbeth. It was only in Dec where a couple loudly flounced out of "Privates on Parade" with their little 8/9 year old son complaining about the bad language (I think it was SRB in his pants that did it). Well excuse me but who is wrong there? Poor parenting, if you want to go to a musical or play that is challenging, has swearing or sexual inuendo then please just ensure it's right for your kids.  Not yet seen any young 'uns in Book of Mormon yet though!

#1750 craftymiss

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 08:20 AM

Oh and Catqc, you are right, if a child can not cope with the noise of a musical then dont take them. I always say to friends when Im asked if something is suitable "have they seen a panto?" If the answer is no then I always suggest they see one or a show aimed at kids first. Again it's down to parenting




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