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Bad Behaviour At A Show


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#1881 Matthew Winn

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 05:39 AM

View Postarmadillo, on 02 June 2013 - 06:30 PM, said:

Or, the fourth alternative, allow photography before the show just as conversation and use of mobile phones is allowed before the show.

Yeah, but the reality is that if you allow photographs before the show then people will start arguing that their photography was OK because the show had only just started, and it's not disturbing anyone, and it was just them, and blah blah blah. People talk and use phones before the show. They also do those things during the show.

Whenever you create two states and a boundary you also create a whole bunch of people who automatically put everything they want to do on the "OK" side of the boundary and argue the toss on that basis. So people only go over the speed limit a little bit, or only overstay their parking ticket for a few minutes, or take just the one flash photograph in a museum, or send just one text message during a show, and they always have excuses: it's OK if it's just me, or I saw other people do it so I didn't realise it was wrong, or I thought it would be OK just this once, or this time it's really important, or I didn't break the rules by much.

Do you really think that if you allow photography at some times and not others then anyone who breaks the rules is going to quietly admit that they knew they were in the wrong?
I have always hated eggs. I remember back when I was a sperm I tried to head-butt one. It did not end well.

#1882 wickedgrin

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 06:35 AM

I find now with IPhones/Cameras that people have the compulsion to photograph everything they see and do constantly. Why can't people just enjoy the moment "live" rather than obsessively watching life through a viewfinder?

If the photos taken were just for personal memories it would not be so bad but they are instantly uploaded to social media - look where I am, look what I am doing. The designers of sets and costumes etc. quite rightly don't want their work all over the web in badly taken amateur pictures.

It is a pity people do not know how to behave anymore. But then this is the "bad behaviour" thread which is now running to 189 pages.

#1883 armadillo

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 09:15 AM

View PostMatthew Winn, on 03 June 2013 - 05:39 AM, said:

Yeah, but the reality is that if you allow photographs before the show then people will start arguing that their photography was OK because the show had only just started, and it's not disturbing anyone, and it was just them, and blah blah blah. People talk and use phones before the show. They also do those things during the show.

Whenever you create two states and a boundary you also create a whole bunch of people who automatically put everything they want to do on the "OK" side of the boundary and argue the toss on that basis. So people only go over the speed limit a little bit, or only overstay their parking ticket for a few minutes, or take just the one flash photograph in a museum, or send just one text message during a show, and they always have excuses: it's OK if it's just me, or I saw other people do it so I didn't realise it was wrong, or I thought it would be OK just this once, or this time it's really important, or I didn't break the rules by much.

Do you really think that if you allow photography at some times and not others then anyone who breaks the rules is going to quietly admit that they knew they were in the wrong?
  Utter nonsense. Conversation is allowed before the show and not during. As is use of mobile phones. Perhaps we should enforce total silence in the auditorium before the show?

#1884 Matthew Winn

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:43 PM

View Postarmadillo, on 03 June 2013 - 09:15 AM, said:

Utter nonsense. Conversation is allowed before the show and not during. As is use of mobile phones. Perhaps we should enforce total silence in the auditorium before the show?

Yes, conversation is allowed before the show, as is use of mobile phones. And some people carry on the same way during the performance, as nearly 2000 posts in this thread amply demonstrate. Yet you maintain that if you allow people to take pictures before the show they'll all stop when they're supposed to.

And I've still to see anyone explain why taking pictures is such a vitally important activity that it justifies an attitude of "how dare they think they're allowed to impose their rules on me". It's their property, not yours. What makes you think you have any rights here? Why do you get to decide whether it's stupid to prevent photographs? And why is it so all-important to you that you get to choose what you're allowed to do with somebody else's work and the owner of the work doesn't?
I have always hated eggs. I remember back when I was a sperm I tried to head-butt one. It did not end well.

#1885 Matthew Winn

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:54 PM

View Postwickedgrin, on 03 June 2013 - 06:35 AM, said:

If the photos taken were just for personal memories it would not be so bad but they are instantly uploaded to social media - look where I am, look what I am doing. The designers of sets and costumes etc. quite rightly don't want their work all over the web in badly taken amateur pictures.

I know a forum where some of the people are full of this sort of thing. It's as if nobody has ever said "no" to them in their entire lives, and they simply don't understand the concept of not being allowed to do whatever they want. They treat it as an infringement of their liberties if someone points out that other people have rights too, and that sometimes other people getting what they want means you don't get what you want. It's like nobody else matters. I don't understand how people can think that way, though this thread makes it all too clear that many people can't think any other way.
I have always hated eggs. I remember back when I was a sperm I tried to head-butt one. It did not end well.

#1886 freckles

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 06:36 AM

View Postdannyboyjohnson, on 02 June 2013 - 07:39 PM, said:

The strictest theatre ive seen for taking photographs is the Piccadilly, they are like hawks attaking prey if they see a flash!! Apollo Victoria has completly given up, you can take pictures of the Wicked stage before and after as much as you want, they wont say anything. I think thats because it has such a mass fanbase that people gave up telling off.

As I have mentioned before in this thread, I find that the staff at the Apollo Victoria allow pretty much anything. I love Wicked, but the audiences are dreadful, and allowed to be.

#1887 Palatio

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:29 AM

A family next to us took a macdonalds into wicked last month to eat before the start. Not an eyebrow raised from the staff there. And the stench was unbelievable up close. I dont care about folk bringing things in (I will ALWAYS bring in water from outside rather than buy the theatre stuff at their exorbitant prices, and if i need an icecream i will pop quickly to a nearby shop). But a full on hot, pungent " meal".........

But if theatres want to flog sweets and all manner of refreshments then that is not helping general theatre etiquette.

#1888 John_Rebus

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 11:14 AM

This is just being reported in German news and seems to fit to the recent discussion:
http://www.artsjourn...egal-video.html

Pianist Krystian Zimerman stopped during his concert when he spotted someone filming him with a smart phone. Asked the person to stop, but nevertheless left the stage for some time.
Lateron he refused to give an encore.

Pity for the other audience members...
"Some People are Worth Melting For." - Olaf, Snowman

#1889 mystifyre

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:21 PM

People these days are over-reliant on their mobile phones. Nothing annoys me more than seeing a glowing, bright phone screen illuminating halfway through a show or a ridiculously loud ringtone buzzing away. Not only is it irritating and distracting to members of the audience, but it's also highly disrespectful to the cast of the production who very often aware of these occurences. Sometimes I wish mobile phones would have no signal after entering the auditorium.

A lot of people just don't know, or simply don't respect, theatre etiquette these days.

#1890 Abby

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:03 AM

This is a slightly sensitive topic, and not really bad behaviour, but I’d be interested in people’s views on theatregoers with a girth wider than their allocated seat. I’ve had a few situations where I’ve been really uncomfortable because the person sitting next to me is taking up a lot of my room as well – it’s a particularly problem in places that have bench seating because people don’t seem to realise they are taking up more than one seat, but I’ve also experienced it with standard seating as well.

It’s partly a problem with some theatres making the seats too small – I’m a size 10 and I don’t find the Trafalgar seats spacious. But are we going to have to start saying that very overweight people have to buy two seats or designated ‘fat seats’ that cost a bit extra? Or should theatres accept we are inevitably going to get fatter and fatter and make their seats wider?

It’s not as bad as the mobile phones, the munchers and the whisperers, but it’s still quite unpleasant to spend two and a half hours with a strangers thigh pressed so firmly against yours that you’re sharing sweat...

While I'm here, I also want to say that I agree wholeheartedly with Matthew Winn's last few posts.




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