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Bad Behaviour At A Show


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#1891 Coated peanut

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:17 AM

View Postfreckles, on 04 June 2013 - 06:36 AM, said:



As I have mentioned before in this thread, I find that the staff at the Apollo Victoria allow pretty much anything. I love Wicked, but the audiences are dreadful, and allowed to be.

And the real problem with that is that the 'Wicked' audience starts to learn that bad behaviour is acceptable, and starts behaving the same at other shows sooner or later. Thanks, Apollo Victoria.

#1892 Coated peanut

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:54 AM

View PostAbby, on 05 June 2013 - 09:03 AM, said:


It’s partly a problem with some theatres making the seats too small – I’m a size 10 and I don’t find the Trafalgar seats spacious. But are we going to have to start saying that very overweight people have to buy two seats or designated ‘fat seats’ that cost a bit extra? Or should theatres accept we are inevitably going to get fatter and fatter and make their seats wider?

Leave aisle seats free so us fatsos can squeeze into those and gently spill into the aisle.

The seating in the NT is pretty decent, and I can't see why new / refurbished theatres need to be smaller than that. Those 20 extra seats aren't worth all the non-returners whose main theatre memory will be feeling squished and uncomfortable, and that's before they sit next to someone large, tall, fat or obsessed with sticking out their elbows)

Even the bench seating is no indicator of whether you'll have space or not. Hardly ever an issue at the Almeida, compete nightmare in upper slips front row at the ROH.

What I do get annoyed about is when I have booked an aisle seat on benched seating  and the person next to me decided to utilise most of the space allocated to my seat and then does the 'you're fat' routine when I move up to the line that actually separates those seats. If your attitude stinks, I might decide to give no way, whilst I'd normally be inclined to do the one-cheek only hover.

#1893 Abby

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 12:31 PM

The thing is, the typical theatregoer is not a slim-hipped 19 year old - it's people like me and (I assume) you who suffer a bit of middle-aged spread, so theatres should be taking that into account. Cottesloe seats were particularly non-spacious, and I ended up uncomfortably close to many people there but I wouldn't say the fault was with me or the perfectly reasonably sized people on either side. Unless someone is immense, we should all expect to get both buttocks on a seat. But there are some people who are far too massive to operate in an average sized world, and I'm not sure what ushers are supposed to do if faced with someone who has a ticket but can't get into their seat or make other people very uncomfortable.

#1894 Coated peanut

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 01:00 PM

I wouldn't want to be an usher making a call like that. There was someone very very large at Stratford recently and he was sitting in a seat that had extra space on either side. I assumed that he rang the theatre and booked the seat especially, though if a theatre had seats like that it might be possible for ushers to ask people to swap?

The problem with those seats tends to be that they are 'superseats' in the stalls, which would make theatre going unaffordable for a lot of people, maybe theatre could come up with the concept of 'comfort' seats that might be up at the balcony level, but still allow people over 12 years old to sit comfortably. Those seats cold be more expensive, but not quite in the £80-100 region

I've encountered people on the train who booked 2 seats to get around the problem, and I think if you genuinely can't fit into a normal seat without your neighbours wearing parts of you, it's time to forgo the theatre or book 2 bench or similar seats without arm rest.
I have a slightly evil system for the ROH, were I book 2 bench seats and then find a skinny friend to come along, or share my seat bounty with the rest of the row and we're all happy.

In the long run I would hope that theatres start putting in slightly more spacious seating generally, seeing that most people are both taller and broader than a few decades ago but I'm not holding my breath....

#1895 zyx123

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 01:21 PM

View PostCoated peanut, on 05 June 2013 - 01:00 PM, said:

I've encountered people on the train who booked 2 seats to get around the problem, and I think if you genuinely can't fit into a normal seat without your neighbours wearing parts of you,

Off topic but how does that work? A train ticket only guarantees you transportation between destinations, it doesn't guarantee you a seat (it's not like a plane). If there is a reservation on a seat but nobody is sat in it, anybody else is free to take that seat.

Anyway, it's not just overweight people who are a problem on bench seating. Recently at the Donmar somebody kept getting to close to me even though they had loads of space (slight dig with the elbow usually kept them away).

#1896 xanderl

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:15 PM

Friend of mine saw a great mobile phone announcement at a theatre in Germany a few months ago -

"Treat yourself to the luxury of being uncontactable. Please turn off your mobile phone"
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#1897 Coated peanut

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:39 PM

View Postzyx123, on 05 June 2013 - 01:21 PM, said:



Off topic but how does that work? A train ticket only guarantees you transportation between destinations, it doesn't guarantee you a seat (it's not like a plane). If there is a reservation on a seat but nobody is sat in it, anybody else is free to take that seat.

The guy sat with his backpack next to him, both seats having a reservation. When someone asked him to move the backpack, he produced his two tickets and said he booked two seats for himself.

#1898 Ruby Sue

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:47 PM

A while back when we went to see Trelawny of the Wells at the Donmar & I had an empty seat between myself & the next woman along. I was enjoying the extra space for a chnage then just as the lights went down for the second half, two girls sprung down from the standing section at the back & squeezed themselves into the one vacant seat! As the lights had gone down & Act 2 had started I couldn't say "what are you doing?!" So spent the second half with one of their butt cheeks practically in my lap. No amount of shuffling or sighing seemed to indicate to her I was uncomfortable & at no point did she say "is it ok we sit here or do you mind being squashed for the rest of the play?"

Talk about people being oblivious!

#1899 Latecomer

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 05:32 PM

Seats at Aylesbury Waterside are superb....really really big and the rows are so far apart that you don't even have to stand to let people get past you....it was built new and someone obviously thought about it! Unlike reports from the new Victoria Theatre in London!
I think unreserved bench seating is quite funny. That moment when the usher says "shuffle up now, there's another space on this row" and we all simultaneously think "really, really?" and then the stand off before we shuffle up with barely disguised resentment!

#1900 John_Rebus

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 06:32 PM

View Postxanderl, on 05 June 2013 - 03:15 PM, said:

Friend of mine saw a great mobile phone announcement at a theatre in Germany a few months ago -

"Treat yourself to the luxury of being uncontactable. Please turn off your mobile phone"

They're playing an English announcement in German Theatres? No wonder no one obeys!

SCNR :)
"Some People are Worth Melting For." - Olaf, Snowman




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