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RSC Twelfth Night


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#1 David

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 08:33 PM

Anyone seen this yet? I was going to book some tickets, but thought I'd ask around first!

#2 Welthorpe

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 09:17 AM

Hi David
Yes - saw it last night on its final preview performance. It's quite fun. The gender mixing of roles is interesting and there's some good energy amongst the cast. Marjorie Yates is a very good Toby Belch and Chris New's Viola is nicely played. I particularly enjoyed James Clyde's Feste - he is on stage most of the performance sat at the piano and has a terrific voice. I usually hate most Festes - but I liked this one. I also thought Justine Mitchell's Olivia was particularly strong. John Lithgow's Malvolio is, as you would expect, nicely played in the hands of a strong comic actor. The down sides were that Annabel Leventon's Aguecheek was almost completely uninteligable and inaudible. She looks the part but puts on a voice that does not carry (and worryingly I was sat in the third row!). It is interesting though without being revelatory if you know what I mean. It got a good reception though and is well worth catching.

#3 Jan Brock

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 11:11 AM

One rule of comedy: A drunken old man is funny. A drunken old woman is tragic.

#4 Haz

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:57 PM

Seeing this on Saturday.. especially looking forward to seeing Chris New as I thought he was just sublime in Bent.
whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should

http://curtain-up.blogspot.com/

#5 Welthorpe

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 01:52 PM

QUOTE(Jan Brock @ Sep 4 2007, 12:11 PM) View Post
One rule of comedy: A drunken old man is funny. A drunken old woman is tragic.


Far be it for me to suggest another's response, but I suspect Sir Toby has already replied to this in act ii scene v:

"marry, hang thee, brock!"  wink.gif

More seriously, if you did not know who was playing the role, you would not necessarily think of it as a woman - so the tragic label does not really apply. This is the point that the production is trying to make I think - that ideas of gender are not always clear cut. Having said that, it would be fair to say that the Belch/Aguecheek lines didn't generate the usual laughs - but that was more down to the fact that no one could work out what Aguecheek was saying for the most part, IMHO. There was not a moment in the play when I was watching Sir Toby and thinking that this was a woman playing a man. But maybe that says more about me ...... someone back me up here, please!   unsure.gif

#6 Lynette

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:46 PM

I didn't realise it was a gender bender job so thanks for warning me; I would have got confused. Is this so they employ more women cos of the Histories being so macho? If so, well done RSC.

#7 Haz

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 02:04 PM

QUOTE(Welthorpe @ Sep 4 2007, 10:17 AM) View Post
I particularly enjoyed James Clyde's Feste - he is on stage most of the performance sat at the piano and has a terrific voice.


I'll echo that sentiment, thought he was just wonderful.

Really loved the production as a whole. Chris New rose even further in my estimations, already being placed pretty highly after Bent.

I thought Olivia (sorry, actress escapes me and don't have my programme here) was fabulous too. So often her role can just be to facilitate the action around her but she made her a really lovely character.

And John Lithgow was just great too. Reminded me a little of Basil Fawlty in the sense of his physical comedy, but in a good way!!

Just really really loved it, and infinitely prefered it to the last RSC production of Twelfth Night I saw in Newcastle a couple of years ago.
whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should

http://curtain-up.blogspot.com/

#8 Snout

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 11:50 AM

I hear of grumblings at the RSC about the director of this show. Another rumour is that John Lithgow became frustrated during rehearsals and felt they were doing too much improvisation stuff and not enough analysis of the text. Any RSC deep throats able to comment on this?

#9 Jan Brock

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:35 AM

QUOTE(Snout @ Sep 12 2007, 12:50 PM) View Post
I hear of grumblings at the RSC about the director of this show. Another rumour is that John Lithgow became frustrated during rehearsals and felt they were doing too much improvisation stuff and not enough analysis of the text. Any RSC deep throats able to comment on this?


John Lithgow - did he ? Ho ho, following in the great tradition of Nicol Williamson, Joss Ackland, Michael Bryant and others who have famously expressed a distaste for recent (ie. last half-century) directorial practices. Who would have thought he would have fitted in so quickly ?








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