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Much Ado At The National


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#11 Alexandra

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 01:07 PM

I remember Nancy Carroll in The Talking Cure at the NT. Her character was about 5 months pregnant and had a small bump, and she moved like she was 9 and a half months pregnant with a 10 lb baby. laugh.gif  But she was good as Cordelia in the Almeida Lear, and very good in that other thing directed by Kent at the NT with Charlotte Rampling - The False Servant I think it was called.

#12 Lynette

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 03:41 PM

I think Kelly Reilly also got noticed in the National Prod of that funny..London Assurance, was it, anyway, her standing there in full armour is a precious memory. Rory Kinnear well on the way, a lovely new talent.

The RSC doesn't always nurture..the young ones come and go, I suppose reluctant to tie themselves up for so long, a season in Stratford, away from the capital and then maybe longer touring or another season in London. Look at the Histories at the moment. And I have no idea of the pay structure so maybe they don't get alot in the shires. It seems to be the middle to older aged guys who stick to the RSC; lots of lords and senators! Some break out like Ian Richardson did and Patrick Stewart, now back.  Some young ones like Joseph Fiennes have better things to do. But I often look for the talented young men and women I see at the RSC the following year and in other places and don't see them.

#13 armadillo

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 06:32 PM

Both Simon Russell Beale and Ralph Fiennes first got public recognition at the RSC (season of 1990 I think - the one with the Plantagenets and a lot of Restoration comedy!). I remember an Observer magazine article of the Plantaganets with a  picture of Fiennes on the cover.  But as you say, that is less likely now they're based at Stratford without the guarentee of London seasons. People don't tend to be in more than 2 plays a season where they used to be in 3 or 4 and regular theatregoers would recognise them (like we do at the NT).

#14 keysersoze

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 09:43 PM

QUOTE(armadillo @ Sep 17 2007, 07:32 PM) View Post
Both Simon Russell Beale and Ralph Fiennes first got public recognition at the RSC (season of 1990 I think - the one with the Plantagenets and a lot of Restoration comedy!). I remember an Observer magazine article of the Plantaganets with a  picture of Fiennes on the cover.  But as you say, that is less likely now they're based at Stratford without the guarentee of London seasons. People don't tend to be in more than 2 plays a season where they used to be in 3 or 4 and regular theatregoers would recognise them (like we do at the NT).


Oliver Ford Davies should prove good casting for Much Ado, but what about the rest of the cast, in the smaller roles? Are they NT regulars?

#15 Polly1

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 09:24 AM

QUOTE(keysersoze @ Sep 19 2007, 10:43 PM) View Post
Oliver Ford Davies should prove good casting for Much Ado, but what about the rest of the cast, in the smaller roles? Are they NT regulars?


I see that Mark Addy has ben cast as Dogberry, so not an NT regular but could be promising.

BTW, in Nick Hytner's little film about the winter NT programme on the website, he doesn't mention MAAN at all. Presumably he thinks the regular NT audience (the middle-aged, middle class, white people that he so despises) will already have booked!

#16 armadillo

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 10:57 AM

QUOTE(Polly1 @ Sep 23 2007, 10:24 AM) View Post
I see that Mark Addy has ben cast as Dogberry, so not an NT regular but could be promising.

BTW, in Nick Hytner's little film about the winter NT programme on the website, he doesn't mention MAAN at all. Presumably he thinks the regular NT audience (the middle-aged, middle class, white people that he so despises) will already have booked!


Do you have any evidence for this? Given that he ticks all these boxes himself, it seems unlikely.  I'd be interested to see a quote from him stating this.

#17 Guest_Eve_*

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 09:35 PM

QUOTE(Polly1 @ Sep 23 2007, 09:24 AM) View Post
I see that Mark Addy has ben cast as Dogberry, so not an NT regular but could be promising.

BTW, in Nick Hytner's little film about the winter NT programme on the website, he doesn't mention MAAN at all. Presumably he thinks the regular NT audience (the middle-aged, middle class, white people that he so despises) will already have booked!


What a dreary, nasty thing to say. Just because he's tried to open up the NT for new audiences doesn't mean he 'despises' the core audience.

Maybe he thinks that MAAN can look after itself at the box office, and is using the little film to push some of the more unusual stuff.

And Mark Addy sounds like a treat, if you ask me...



#18 Theatresquirrel

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Posted 24 September 2007 - 06:40 PM

Mark Addy's casting reminds me somehow of when NH cast Phil Daniels in 'Winter's Tale'.

That was such a mindblowingly special production for me; I'd be the happiest chappy this side of Christmas if Much Ado About Nothing is even half as good as that was.

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 02:04 AM

QUOTE(Theatresquirrel @ Sep 24 2007, 06:40 PM) View Post
Mark Addy's casting reminds me somehow of when NH cast Phil Daniels in 'Winter's Tale'.

That was such a mindblowingly special production for me; I'd be the happiest chappy this side of Christmas if Much Ado About Nothing is even half as good as that was.



TS - The Winters Tale was my first Nick Hytner show and my first Shakespeare at the NT. It was a revelation for me. And I'm thrilled it had something of the same effect for you.

E x

#20 Guest_Eve_*

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 02:06 AM

and this is just a rumour I heard second hand but apparently this is going to be a full on elizabethan period show...




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