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Twelfth Night(nt)


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#1 MaxCady

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 11:09 AM

Sold out already. Is this a joke? Why is this show in the Cottesloe? Seems like absolute farcial decision to play that is going to be this popular in such small theatre. I sure as hell wont be paying 10 for a very restricted view from a day seat

#2 Weez

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 11:17 AM

The three theatres are very different from each other (or can be when you're not using the Cottesloe as a mini-Lyttelton); if the production is doing something particular with the space in the Cottesloe that cannot be achieved in the Lyttelton or Olivier, then you don't have any other option. Although if it turns out they are just using it as a mini-Lyttelton again, I expect my sympathies will change. laugh.gif

(I seem to remember Ian Holm's King Lear also played the Cottesloe, although I don't really know what they did with the space...)

Also, there are other shows in the other auditoria. I would be very surprised if Peter Hall weren't able to get the auditorium of his choice, but there is always the possibility he didn't get his request in early enough this time. happy.gif

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#3 TheatreMadGoer

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 11:23 AM

I didn't see the Holm Lear, but didn't they play with the space for that one, I have a vague and probably incorrect memory of something akin to the Deborah Warner Richard II

#4 Polly1

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 11:24 AM

Perhaps to ensure it becomes a 'hot ticket' so that when it inevitably transfers (either internally or to the West End) with a much-less starry cast, it will still be successful (despite there having been seemingly almost as many productions of this play as of Hamlet over the last couple of years).... or am I being too cynical?

#5 young offender

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 12:34 PM

You could say the same about Derek Jacobi's forthcoming Lear at the Donmar - that sold out on the first day of public booking back in April.
I'm sure those involved in both would say that they need intimate spaces for their particular interpretations.

Yes, it does generate buzz, but that's good for theatre generally.

#6 Lynette

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 02:01 PM

They can do amazing things with the Cottesloe as those of you who recall the ensemble days of Candleford and The Miracles will agree. Who else went to the promenade productions and was shoved gracefully out of the way to enable actors to scythe the fields to the Albion String Band? That kind of thing had a great influence on subsequent productions, the need to convince and connect. And many , many more imaginative settings come to mind.

The Holm Lear used the space longwise and had a sheet of water down one side [ I got a bit wet..] and the Henry Goodman Merchant of Venice was in the roundish. It's nice to see Shakespeare done up close and personal as our actors today are so good they can do it well. These days there is a tendency to plonk a cushion down here and there to indicate intimate indoor space and so I wonder how they will do Twelfth Night with its indoors and in between places settings. I think I'd rather see nothing than another joint stool  rolleyes.gif or chaise hauled on by stage hands. And carpets - how they love to unroll them there carpets - happens nearly every show I see! In Twelfth Night there is of course one of the very funniest scenes in Shakespeare, the box tree. Maybe this time the actors wil get inside a box tree.

#7 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 03:27 PM

Quite a few EP tickets left though. They're not doing anything fancy with the Cottesloe for this as you can pick your own seats, so I'm not quite sure why it's not in the Lyttleton. Maybe he wants that intimate feel. Got my EP this morning as booking opened, but I know a few people who got full price semi-restricted this morning. I guess for productions like this it's worth being a member.



#8 Lynette

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 03:37 PM

This production is sponsored by Neptune Investment management - cue absolutely drenched Viola [ don't sit in front row] in Scene I with flippers and goggles which make lietmotif appearances throughout. Can't wait.

#9 Weez

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 03:42 PM

Unless they do it in the right order, in which case that'd be scene 2. wink.gif

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#10 Lynette

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 03:43 PM

You see, I've only seen messed around shows, no order..sorry for that slip. So umbrellas up after scene 1.




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