Jump to content


- - - - -

stage magic


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
26 replies to this topic

#1 Reich

Reich

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1028 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:London

Posted 24 February 2007 - 09:46 AM

http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol...icle1414823.ece

Broadway has been very good to me. But then, I've been very good to broadway.


#2 Blue

Blue

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 318 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 24 February 2007 - 12:04 PM

I am always astounded by the props in Mary Poppins. I always like to sit on the front row and everything is seamlessly withouth fault. It really is magic because I'm not sure how else it can be done. And its all the more impressive because its being created in real life (sometimes twice a day).

#3 Guest_Guest_*

Guest_Guest_*
  • Guests

Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:41 PM

I can never work out how 'magic' works..

#4 Belle

Belle

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 384 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London, UK
  • Interests:Musical theatre, costumes, shiny things

Posted 24 February 2007 - 11:41 PM

Apparently the Mary Poppins backstage tour is fascinating...   I think I might have to skive a morning's college to have a look!
###Belle###

#5 Blue

Blue

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 318 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 25 February 2007 - 08:25 AM

I don't know if that would spoil the show for me learning how some of the tricks are accomplished.

#6 achilles

achilles

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 108 posts

Posted 25 February 2007 - 12:22 PM

I'm writing a book about special effects at the moment, and that Times article says it all. An illusion right in front of you is so much more powerful than any CG epic. The msot jaw dropping effect I have ever seen was the appearance of the whale in the Royal Exchange's Moby Dick. For weeks I'd been workign out how they might do it, and then they fooled me totally. A stunning stunning but so simple effect.

#7 Matthew Winn

Matthew Winn

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bletchley

Posted 25 February 2007 - 02:45 PM

One of the most impressive tricks I've seen on stage was in a panto where a flying carpet effect had me completely baffled because even though I was looking for the carpet's support I couldn't see it anywhere. (This is in contrast to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, where the magic of theatre transformed a dummy car on a stick into something that looked exactly like a dummy car on a stick.) It took me several days to work out how it could be done. I still don't know for sure whether I'm right in that particular case, but I know how I'd recreate the effect if I had to do so.

However, sometimes the simplest magic can be surprisingly effective. Once you know how Evita gets from her bed to the balcony, or how the boxes come to life in Avenue Q, then what's going on is so blindingly obvious you wonder how anyone could miss it. Simple redirection can work wonders.

As for Mary Poppins, I found all the effects rather easy to follow. Perhaps it's because I've been crew on over thirty shows so I'm used to the fact that what looks like a solid wall is wood and canvas from the other side, but I found it quite clear how everything was done. That doesn't change the fact that it was done with remarkable deftness. They've done a fantastic job.

Another effect that impressed me was in The Witches of Eastwick, where the three women sat on a large sofa in the middle of the stage and then went flying even though earlier in the scene it was clear that they weren't attached to wires. The second time I saw the show, and knowing when the flying happens, the point at which they're hooked up couldn't have been more obvious if they'd announced it with a marching band, but at the same time I remembered that I'd missed it myself the first time around.
I have always hated eggs. I remember back when I was a sperm I tried to head-butt one. It did not end well.

#8 Reich

Reich

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1028 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:London

Posted 25 February 2007 - 04:34 PM

Lotso of effects I love;

The train in the natioanal tour of Aspects of Love
The sea effects in the Royal Ballet's Pinocchio. This was just a sheet of fabric but used so beautifully. This is often what I like the best, creativity and something that forces you to use your imagination
Most of the Phantom stuff left me cold but what I did really like was the invisable door in the managers office

As a Sondheim fan I was so impressed with the recent SITPWG. The composer doesn't really lend himself to special effects ... From the rubbing out of characters or tree's or the autumn leaves falling just before the song Beautiful this combined with the projections blew me away. What I really loved about this show was the gallery scenes in act two, how the travelator moved the characters from the installation to the reception and this was perfectly timed with the projections


Broadway has been very good to me. But then, I've been very good to broadway.


#9 David

David

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Camelot

Posted 25 February 2007 - 05:40 PM

There were parts of Blue Man Group that impressed me, and I really couldn't work out when or how the digital projections of typists changed into people (Blue Men) with the suits covered in LEDS.

#10 Richey

Richey

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 191 posts
  • Location:Chester

Posted 28 February 2007 - 03:38 PM

QUOTE(Matthew Winn @ Feb 25 2007, 02:45 PM) View Post
However, sometimes the simplest magic can be surprisingly effective. Once you know how Evita gets from her bed to the balcony.

It was pretty obvious the night we saw it- we could see her walk across the stage!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users