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Badly Behaved Audiences


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#31 siobhan

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:40 PM

Some of the older ones are hard of hearing, so when they make a comment to the person next to them, they are actually talking quite loudly.

Also, why is it that some parents like to put small children onto their lap during a show when there is a seat next to them for him/her. It blocks my view of the stage and is extremely rude. Does anybody else have experience of this? This has happened a few times.
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#32 Lynette

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 04:14 PM



And in the midst of all this, a group of three small boys no older than 6 or 7 sat enthralled and well behaved during the entire thing...
[/quote]


AAAhhhh..the power of theatre


#33 Legend

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 06:22 PM

QUOTE(siobhan @ Jan 29 2008, 03:40 PM) View Post
Also, why is it that some parents like to put small children onto their lap during a show when there is a seat next to them for him/her. It blocks my view of the stage and is extremely rude. Does anybody else have experience of this? This has happened a few times.


They think that they are sat at home watching TV and have no concept of the idea that their actions might be disturbing others around them.

#34 Montmartre

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 10:27 PM

Perhaps it would be an idea for theatres to have special child-friendly booking dates (depending on type of show of course) two or three times a year. That way, people could eliminate those dates from booking.

#35 siobhan

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 10:58 PM

QUOTE(Montmartre @ Jan 29 2008, 10:27 PM) View Post
Perhaps it would be an idea for theatres to have special child-friendly booking dates (depending on type of show of course) two or three times a year. That way, people could eliminate those dates from booking.

Yes, that would be a way around it, it's just a shame that people don't observe these basic manners.
It would be impossible to reel off a whole list of do's or don'ts in the announcement before the show, but as someone mentioned before in an earlier thread maybe there could be a 'tips' page in the programme, told in a jokey way as not to get people's backs up.
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#36 Legend

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 08:09 AM

QUOTE(Montmartre @ Jan 29 2008, 10:27 PM) View Post
Perhaps it would be an idea for theatres to have special child-friendly booking dates (depending on type of show of course) two or three times a year. That way, people could eliminate those dates from booking.


What about OAP free dates as well please?

#37 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 10:10 AM

QUOTE(Legend @ Jan 30 2008, 08:09 AM) View Post
What about OAP free dates as well please?


I havn't really had a bad experience of children - most children once you explain to them what and how they are expected to behave usually do! OAP/Middle Aged know it alls tend top be the worst and very ignorant to the fact that people around them have paid good money to see the same show they have.

id rather go to an all kids show, and watch them enjoy and experience the magic of theatre than sit with the 3 people i had to at fiddler on the roof (see previous post in this thread)
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#38 Richey

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 10:19 AM

Again it was the supposedly mature members of the audience at the Adelphi for Joseph last night who were particularly irritating. Before the show there was a general inability to find the correct seats, but what was most annoying were the group sat behind me who found certain parts of the show so hilarious that had to laugh hysterically- 'oh look there's some camp men in loincloths, how funny....oh look there's a man dressed as elvis, my sides are splitting....' Plus some of the whoopers and whistlers from Wicked seemed to have found their way across town.
It wasn't just the audience behaviour either- some of the FOH staff thought they ought to be on stage and were putting in their own performances whilst trying to sell merchandise.

#39 Matthew Winn

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 11:17 AM

QUOTE(Richey @ Jan 30 2008, 10:19 AM) View Post
Again it was the supposedly mature members of the audience at the Adelphi for Joseph last night who were particularly irritating. Before the show there was a general inability to find the correct seats,

I've never understood why so few people think ahead and realise that if they're going into an unfamiliar building it might help if they look at the seating plan first. That way they'll be able to see roughly where to go, and it also means that if they're a long way from an aisle they can sit down early so they don't have to squeeze past eveyone else and if they're next to an aisle they can sit down later so they don't have to sniff in irritation at everyone trying to squeeze past them.

Mind you, some theatres don't help matters by putting the numbers in non-obvious places, or by using numbers that may look stylish in daylight but fade into unreadability in the dim light of the auditorium. I remember one theatre where the numbers were on the underside of the seat, so if the seat had stuck in the down position you couldn't see the number at all and even when it was raised you had to crouch to see it.

QUOTE
but what was most annoying were the group sat behind me who found certain parts of the show so hilarious that had to laugh hysterically- 'oh look there's some camp men in loincloths, how funny....oh look there's a man dressed as elvis, my sides are splitting....'
"Listen to me laughing really loudly to show that I understand the joke, even though it isn't actually all that funny."

QUOTE
It wasn't just the audience behaviour either- some of the FOH staff thought they ought to be on stage and were putting in their own performances whilst trying to sell merchandise.

I've seen several of them on stage. (Legitimately, when they've been performing in other shows.) I like it when the FoH staff get into the swing of things.
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#40 Backdrifter

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 01:08 PM

Lord preserve us from the Overlaugher. Yes, yes, yes, I know I'm laying myself open to comments of "Well we must stop the rising tide of people actually laughing in theatres!" and of course I don't want to stop people laughing, but there is a clear divide between genuine laughter and the noises that emanante from an Overlaugher. Yes it's partly what Matthew just said about telegraphing their understanding of the joke, but when it's not in response to a joke in the first place it's difficult to know why they're doing it. Last night at Assassins an Overlaugher sat next to me, sniggering wheezily like a one-man Beavis & Butthead through almost the entire show, mostly at pieces of action that were completely serious and in some cases significantly dramatic.

By the way, something else happened that was a first for me. I'd never been to the Landor before so don't know if they always have a bench rear left near the entrance, but last night there was and the three people who sat on it thought it'd be spiffing if they dragged it forwards to be level with front row - only to find they were almost completely blocking the performers' entry & exit. Stewards asked them to move it back, which they did but not far enough, so cue occasional bouts of scraping as they and the bench made their way by degrees back to where they'd started.

Definitely a new one on me - audience disruption caused by moving bits of the auditorium around. But well done to the woman behind me who, after opening a noisy crackly bag of something pre-show, then decanted whatever it was into some other receptacle in order to avoid making noise during the performance.
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