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The Caretaker


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#1 Guest_Tanya_*

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 04:28 PM

The Caretaker is now going into the Tricycle. It's a brilliant production all the actors are brilliant. Anyone planning to go and see it?

#2 Guest_Guest_*

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 04:30 PM

It's cak and it's just like every other Pinter only with a crummy EastEnder thrown in the mix.

#3 Jan Brock

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Posted 02 March 2007 - 02:28 PM

I'll be seeing it for the excellent David Bradley - I wasn't aware that someone in it was from EastEnders because I don't watch it, unlike you it appears - shouldn't you find a TV discussion board instead ?

#4 theatrefan

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 10:39 PM

The "crummy Eastender" hasn't been in Eastenders for a while. Also, from performances I have seen, Nigel is anything but "crummy"! He's one of the best fairly new actors I've seen for a while. Just wish I could get down to see this show.
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#5 wickedgrin

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 08:07 AM

Well this is a suberb production to the play and I'm not a Pinter "fan". David Bradley and Con O Neil (an Olivier Award Winner) have never to my knowledge appeared in a soap and Nigel Harman before getting a break in Eastenders did years of theatre work so is a very experienced stage actor. The acting is faultless in this production - go see!!

#6 xTanyax

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 12:00 AM

Thank you I also think Nigel Harman is brilliant in this as are David Bradley and Con O'Neil, all of them portray the characters superbly.

#7 Stuart

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 09:50 AM

I have my tickets after seeing an advert in the 39 steps program, I got all excited then.
it is such a great play and Con O'Neil sold it too me too, great actor be interesting to see his take on Aston who i think is the hardest part in the play. My wife who does not usually partake in play-going is also coming for different reasons to mine!!!!

Anybody any advice as to how to get there and where to park etc. I am travelling from the South East

#8 xTanyax

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 12:45 PM

Con is brilliant in it, it is such a hard role and he gets it spot on. I have no idea about travel by car I'll be getting the tube lol

#9 Alisha

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 04:12 PM

Hi, I'm new here. Just joined biggrin.gif

Tanya would know me. laugh.gif

I love this play. I've seen it several times and think its brilliant. David Bradley, Con O Neil and Nigel Harman all give impeccable performances.

It’s easy to assume that Nigel wouldn't be good because he is an ex-soap star but believe me, this is so not the case. Nigel has an extensive amount of acting credentials/expereince and he's no stranger to theatre. His history on stage speaks for itself (way before he became a household name in EE). Go see it and you may change your mind. smile.gif

He gives a powerhouse performance and morphs into the role wonderfully. He gets the character down to a tee and adopts the persona perfectly. They all do. It really is an all-great cast and their performances for me, blew me away.

I've already seen in the Tricycle but plan to go again.

^ Click ^

#10 El Peter

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 12:05 PM

I'd never seen the play and knew only that historically it had been a success for Pinter. I've liked other plays and screenplays by him and on the strength of them I got along to see 'The Caretaker'. I was looking forward to it, I was so keen to see this theatre classic after decades of reading about it. Having seen it at the Tricycle, however, I could not see why the just-published reviews that turn out to be so positive about the performances by good actors and the quality of the set design, did not question such a bad play.

My companion had noticed empty seats after the interval that had been occupied hitherto, though she only remarked on this later on when discussing our night at the theatre. I was bemused throughout my time in the dark at the Tricycle but endured, at first in expectation, then in hope, and eventually in resignation that I might as well see it through to the end.

I've seen the play, but had to read the programme and then some reviews to try to find out what I'd seen, who the characters had been, and why they were on a stage at the same time. One lad started on stage on his own, looked about for a few minutes before walking out. Then two other men came in, one of whom was scruffy and grumpy, while the other was poorly dressed and quiet while fiddling with a screwdriver and plug. The first fellow came in again, the plug-fiddler having gone next door or to watch the football in the pub or to put the kettle on (if so, it never boiled), and blew up a temper over a bag that the scruffy one wanted, though in either case why was unclear. The scruffy fellow had to meet a man in Wembley, or had been born there, or had been raised in Shoreditch or had tried to get to the bus garage there except... And on and on it went. The frequent arguing may have been plot twists, yet if so then where was the plot? It was like watching a play consisting of three middles, or three beginnings, or three ends, yet with none of these elements as such. It was hard work and I had nothing to show for it. The theatre programme uses a passage from Michael Billington's 'The Life and Work of Harold Pinter' to recount what inspired the playwright to write this particular play but only describes a spark where more about the eventual flame is required.  

Now if you're a dedicated Pinter fan, and I've read one review that says this is definive, the best production of 'The Caretaker' yet, do get along to see this. I love the Tricycle Theatre and like these particular actors, and it grieves me to feel so disappointed by a play when the consequences of views like mine above could affect livelihoods. Be that as it may, this has been written, staged and we paid out our money and think as we do.

I enjoyed National Theatre of Brent's 'The 39 Steps' more. Ditto Shaw's 'John Bull's Other Island' and Behan's 'The Quare Fellow', and various 'verbatim' productions, all at the Tricycle. Also, far better than 'The Caretaker' was a rarely shown "early, immature Pinter, his first stage play" called 'The Dwarfs' which the Tricycle put on for a run several years ago.

I've enjoyed films like 'The Servant' and 'Accident' and 'The Go-Between' and they repay more than one viewing, while the older Pinter with his contempt for the sycophants of US imperialism and their complicity with allied warmongers, the torture and bullying regimes, is fine by me. His has been a great contribution to the arts. His blunt directness has been refreshing, and it is in that spirit that I make these comments about the play.              





  





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