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Giving Sam A Hard Time


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#21 Guest_Guest_Thatguyp_*_*

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 05:48 PM

QUOTE(rona910 @ May 23 2008, 04:24 PM) View Post
All of you have a fair point, but remember that that's the kind of business these girls are trying to get into. They put themselves into the public eye by signing up for the show, and if any of them thought that they were going to carve a career in acting, music, theatre, anything like that without meeting some very harsh criticism then they're dreaming. To be successful you have to be able to take on board criticism, use it to improve yourself but not let it drag you down, and if they can't do that then quite frankly they should go home now and give up on theatre.


Of course you have to be able to take criticism, rona, no-one is disputing that... but there's a world of difference between criticism and scathing insults. It takes so little effort to be thoughtful about the way one offers a criticism. It is so much more pleasant to be constructive than destructive. What is it with this business that it's happy to be regarded in such a bad light, full of bitchiness, jealousy, intolerance.... ??? I repeat that these are young people starting out on their careers, and as such, they should be welcomed and encouraged, not torn apart for daring to intrude on some hallowed soil of smug superiority! The 'kind of business' they want to get into is 'entertainment', and they are young enough to believe that it might be an exciting and worthwhile career! It's just a pity that a bunch of old cynics can portray it as such an unpleasant and unwelcoming environment!



#22 Guest_Jeanne_*

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 05:52 PM

Having said that amateurs get ripped apart by critics too and we don't even get paid!

#23 rona910

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 06:07 PM

I can tell you that it doesn't make any difference what age you are... When I was only 13 (playing in a Children's orchestra) as the only girl in the horn section I was told that girls didn't belong in the brass section of an orchestra and that I should leave. Yet that just made me even more determined to do well and the next year I laughed in the guy's face when I was back as leader of the section.

Anyhoo, the point of that little ramble was that it's the harshest critics who spur you on to do your best, and age has little to do with it.

#24 allthatjazz

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 06:33 PM

QUOTE(rona910 @ May 23 2008, 05:24 PM) View Post
All of you have a fair point, but remember that that's the kind of business these girls are trying to get into. They put themselves into the public eye by signing up for the show, and if any of them thought that they were going to carve a career in acting, music, theatre, anything like that without meeting some very harsh criticism then they're dreaming. To be successful you have to be able to take on board criticism, use it to improve yourself but not let it drag you down, and if they can't do that then quite frankly they should go home now and give up on theatre.


While I agree with you about this being the business that the ladies have chosen for themselves I have to say that although they do undoubtedly have to learn to take criticism and use it to their advantage without letting it drag them down, they aren't all going to be able to do it naturally and easily this early in their chosen career.  I am sure that none of them expected to carve out a career in theatre without encountering harsh and brutal criticism, maybe they aren't as mentally strong as they thought they were and this is the only way to challenge that side of themselves.  There are going to be times this early on when they are going to be disappointed and deflated, it's human.  I am all for constructive criticism but my motto is 'it's not what you say, it's how you say it'.  Tone and volume make all the difference in the world!

#25 Guest_Guest_Thatguyp_*_*

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 12:01 AM

QUOTE(allthatjazz @ May 23 2008, 06:33 PM) View Post
While I agree with you about this being the business that the ladies have chosen for themselves I have to say that although they do undoubtedly have to learn to take criticism and use it to their advantage without letting it drag them down, they aren't all going to be able to do it naturally and easily this early in their chosen career.  I am sure that none of them expected to carve out a career in theatre without encountering harsh and brutal criticism, maybe they aren't as mentally strong as they thought they were and this is the only way to challenge that side of themselves.  There are going to be times this early on when they are going to be disappointed and deflated, it's human.  I am all for constructive criticism but my motto is 'it's not what you say, it's how you say it'.  Tone and volume make all the difference in the world!


Precisely! Very well stated, allthatjazz!

#26 Guest_Jennell_*

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 09:13 AM

QUOTE(rona910 @ May 23 2008, 06:07 PM) View Post
I can tell you that it doesn't make any difference what age you are... When I was only 13 (playing in a Children's orchestra) as the only girl in the horn section I was told that girls didn't belong in the brass section of an orchestra and that I should leave.



When I was 9 I played Oliver. As I was a female this caused some complaints but I had very short curly blond hair and was a tomboy and could sing. This was In Germany. I got on with it however, and I think did a good job of it. Evidently most folk watching only knew I was a girl because of my name--I do not know if that was a compliment--I think in that case it was--. If anyone is doing something unexpected they are sure to get complaints from someone. You just have to work hard and get on with the job and prove them wrong.


#27 Guest_Guest_Morgan_*_*

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 04:08 PM

Well said thatguyp.

As a mere member of the audience (albeit a paying one) I have been appalled at some of the bitchy comments on here.  It certainly helps to reinforce the stereotypical image of performing being a very backstabbing profession to be in.  Some of the contributors appear to be jealous of the girls on IDA especially the younger Nancies, they even sound as if they feel threatened by them - perhaps they do.

Anyway, I have liked Jessie from the beginning, I now like Sam very much and I thought Niamh was very talented.  I am not a teenage fan, which some contributors seem to think is the only support they have, I am old enough to be their mother.  I have enjoyed watching and listening to all 3 of them.  They have entertained and that, at the end of the day is what the profession is all about.

I would like to see Jessie or Sam as Nancy, they would bring a freshness and vitality to the role.  They can be trained for the West End stage just as they have been trained for the live TV studio and they have shown a confidence and talent which will stand them in good stead in the future.





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