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Phantom Of The Opera ~ 2012, Uk Tour


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#281 Danilo

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:06 PM

Sorry Laughingmonsta, I perhaps shouldn't have said 'without ANY H&S implications' but I don't particularly care for you saying I show 'clear ignorance'.Perhaps what I should simply have said that the Budapest production managed the representation of a falling chandelier in an effective way, something the UK Tour has been unable to do for whatever reason. (Have you seen the Budapest production?) I wouldn't have cared if it was a video projection of a falling chandelier, but a chandelier that wobbles and lets off a solitary firework was a pretty poor attempt given the rest of the set design was generally good and high quality.Anyway, I'm just an occasional poster here and clearly too ignorant to post.

#282 SHk

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:49 PM

Well, I am quite happlily forgive the lack of chandellier if the rest of the production is this good. But I can understand if other people serisouly miss it as it is a part of the original story.


BTW, also gone is the Red Death. This too is a part of the original story if I remember it correctly. But it was replaced by an ordinary looking army officer sort of uniform with a full-face golden mask which spilts in half later.  Now, I do wish they kept an aspect of Red Death, but I am very relieved that the original's Red Death costume is gone.  This is what I meant by "silly" things in the original (don't kill me, I am an enthusistic fan of the original too!). That design, IMO, was a little OTT. I'd even call it a bit indulgent of the designer.  In fact, I am not at all keen on the entire collection of Mascarade costumes - too many colours, too many fabrics - though that's exactly what the designer intended. But, Red Death costume is in a different level. I wouldn't be surprised if that costume caused some laughters in the auditorium. At least, I feel like giggling everytime I see it.So, now Red Death is gone. And I am very happy about it.  


Oh and, so is the wired Chinese costume the Phantom wears in his Lair. It might've been fashonable in Paris around that time, but it does look wiered, so I didn't like it either. Bye bye funny costumes.

#283 Cactus

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:58 PM

Not a Phantom fan, really, but I don't see what's so ridiculous and silly about the Red Death costume...?! The whole show is quite OTT and indulgent, especially regarding costumes. I found the costume quite fitting for someone who'd write an opera like Don Juan Triumphant...

#284 SHk

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:11 PM

Well, the entire thing is a bit silly in my view.  I don't know what you call those puffy short trousers - bloomers? - which might even has a cod piece (though it may be entirely fitting for the period the costume was inteded). Similar costume appears in Don Juan, but that's worn by Piangi.  I really don't like to see Phantom wearing puffy bloomers with a cod piece attached in the middle. That's juat my opinion, but a long-held one and I am not going to change it.

#285 The Scorpion

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 11:56 AM

I couldn't disagree more about your criticism of the Red Death costume -- it's a homage to an iconic image in Phantom lore, from the original novel to the Lon Chaney film.

#286 theplaymirrorslife

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:07 PM

It's not so much the H&S considerations that will have prohibited a more 'agile' chandelier (in fact the original tour chandelier could drop far faster than it's HM counterpart...), it's the cost and installation factors. For the last tour, the get-in itself took weeks in each venue, and building works for understage and on the roofs of the venues in preperation for the get-in, weeks and perhaps months before this. For a seamless 'last show in one venue Sat night, first show in next venue middle of following week' it entailed there being two sets, leapfrogging each other; one production playing its final weeks in one venue whilst the next venue was already fitting up with the other set.

That's clearly not sustainable cost wise, and there were / still are only a handful of venues in the UK equipped to accomodate that size of show.

So they've had the dilemma of - do you scale down the original, or create a new version, capable of touring to more venues etc etc.

That said, it is a shame that something more couldn't be done creatively to suggest the chandelier dropping - projections etc...

Really looking forward to seeing it in Manchester!

#287 David J

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 06:01 PM

View Posttheplaymirrorslife, on 05 April 2012 - 04:07 PM, said:

<br />It's not so much the H&amp;S considerations that will have prohibited a more 'agile' chandelier (in fact the original tour chandelier could drop far faster than it's HM counterpart...), it's the cost and installation factors. For the last tour, the get-in itself took weeks in each venue, and building works for understage and on the roofs of the venues in preperation for the get-in, weeks and perhaps months before this. For a seamless 'last show in one venue Sat night, first show in next venue middle of following week' it entailed there being two sets, leapfrogging each other; one production playing its final weeks in one venue whilst the next venue was already fitting up with the other set. br />
<br /><br /><br />

I remember hearing on a tour of the Mayflower Theatre that they had to cope with eight or so lorries queing down the road when the Phantom came in January 2000. There was not even a pantomine during that winter because of it.

The Mayflower now has a proper loading bay for large scale productions (oh, the irony)
My reviews can also be found at "A Night at the Theatre"

http://www.anightatthetheatre.co.uk/

#288 theplaymirrorslife

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:14 PM

View PostDavid J, on 05 April 2012 - 06:01 PM, said:

<br />&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br /&gt;<br /><br />I remember hearing on a tour of the Mayflower Theatre that they had to cope with eight or so lorries queing down the road when the Phantom came in January 2000. There was not even a pantomine during that winter because of it.<br /><br />The Mayflower now has a proper loading bay for large scale productions (oh, the irony)<br />
<br /><br /><br />

I remember the same at the Bradford Alhambra... Much as a lot of people love the original show, it's one of the most 'untourable' (is that a word??) shows around for most of our regional Victorian & Edwardian venues (unlke the US with their mega converted movie palaces). Personally then I think it's better to have created a completely new show rather than a cut down, pale, watered down imitation of the original. With such specific stage actions as crashing chandeliers though, it needs more than a bit of creativity to stage.... Interesting what some people have said about the how the Budapest staging achieved it. Seems to me that they've made a conscious, deliberate decision to move away from physically depicting it falling.

#289 SHk

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 03:20 PM

View PostThe Scorpion, on 05 April 2012 - 11:56 AM, said:

<br />I couldn't disagree more about your criticism of the Red Death costume -- it's a homage to an iconic image in Phantom lore, from the original novel to the Lon Chaney film.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Yes, I can actually appreciate the homage side of Red Death.  All I am saying is that very few actor (if any at all) can look good (or at least not gigglable) in that costume, unless it's the film version's design and the actor is Gerard Butler.


Another odd thing gone is the shadow-theatre-ish bit of Bouquet's(is it how his name is spelled?) hanging. I like it much better now the Phantoms disguises as a stage-hand and actually hangs him, instead of mimicking hanging using his own neck to demonstrate (?) what's going to happen. Isn't it a little undignified of Phantom to do such a thing?


Besides it gives the Phantom more stage time albeit also giving him the burden of another costume change.


May I just add that I like his new wig.  It suits JOJ much better (the original wig only suits actors with slim faces...if I may say so..) and makes him look like a tormented composer than an elusive phantom-like figure.  It suits the new productions's less gothic take too. The Phantoms is there as a human-being and still doing terrifying things to people in the opera house.


That's why, in my view, that the new MotN look works in this new production. The composer side of the Phantom is more emphasised than in the original. Though I can still understand why some people don't like the new MotN, I would also like to point out that the original choreography can appear too stylised with possibly puzzling implications, depending on who are playing the 2 leads. In fact, "less stylised" is one of the main reasons I like the new version very much.  I love the original to death (and JOJ!!), but the new version shows that less-gothic and less-stylised also work.

#290 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:00 PM

Im at Press Night in Manchester on Tuesday will let you know my thoughts!
This is my street, I smile at the faces I've known all my life, They regard me with pride.




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