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Phantom Of The Opera ~ 2012, Uk Tour


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#301 Bricabrac

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 06:30 PM

View PostSHk, on 10 April 2012 - 05:30 PM, said:



As for the un-masking, again I too appreciate that it was there in the respected film version, but it's a NEW production.  So the director should not be blamed for creating his own version of the same story because that's exactly what he was paid to do, I imagine.

He can if he uses bad judgement as he might have done in this scene.
"Kind hearted" is hardly all that Christine was at the unmasking in the original. She was also disillusioned because she had been lied to and suckered down into the Opera House cellars by someone she naïvely had thought was, perhaps, an angel sent by her father. She now knows he's just a man, and if she is POd, I can't blame her.

#302 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:08 PM

My Review of the show from Tonight in Manchester

Just over 25 years ago, Andrew Lloyd Webber alongside producer Cameron Mackintosh opened a musical in London based on Gaston Leroux’s famous novel ‘Le Fantome de l’Opera’. Lloyd Webber created the show as a personal love letter to his then wife Sarah Brightman. It was no surprise that the show was a critical success and one could almost argue that the musical already has a definitive staging, but director Laurence Connor has once again proved after his success with re-staging Les Miserables in 2010 that with careful thought and a sharp eye for detail anything is possible.

Throwing caution to the wind, Connor has changed almost every part of this epic musical’s staging, for all those minute plot holes that hung around the original’s neck are here delt with logical direction and precision, the characters that populate this production feel more rounded, more grounded and above all more believable because of it, the journey to the Phantom’s liar being of one particular highlight. Add to the already heady mix, a set design which quite frankly dwarfs the London original, it firmly places us deep within the structure of Paris’ Opera Populaire; from the stage, dressing rooms and damp, dark and mysterious catacombs far below ground level Paul Brown’s rotating set is a perfect centrepiece to anchor all the action. In honour of the late Maria Bjornson her costume designs are vividly realised in a bright array of stunning attire, that add another dimension to this staggering production. Paule Constable creates a deliciously eerie atmosphere with her striking lighting design, whilst Lloyd Webbers soaring and emotional score is powerfully commanded by the able hand of Anthony Gabrielle.

At the centre of this new production are three veterans of the London production, in the role of Christine is Katie Hall who surprised many 2 years ago with her portrayal of Cossette in Connor’s production of Les Miserables. Here Hall proves that she is every bit a leading lady, not only do her strong soprano vocals fill the large auditorium but her characterisation is full of depth, making the final scene even more powerful and emotive than I can ever recall. Simon Bailey returns to play the part of Raoul, as devilishly distinguished as ever before, he fills the shoes of the Vicomte de Chagny with charm and panache and thanks to Connor’s new direction a more centred passion and anger throughout.

But it takes a performer of real gravitas and charisma, a performer who understands that a role requires depth and understanding, that just singing a role is not sufficient in musical theatre to take on the role of the enigmatic Erik. The part is bestowed on the sensational John Owen-Jones, who will very soon become the actor to have played the Phantom on more occasions than any other performer in the world. Owen-Jones’ portrayal of the tortured and disfigured Opera Ghost is on one hand tender and sensitive, whilst on the other wrapped full of rage, jealousy and bitterness. Arguably Owen-Jones is THE musical actor of his generation and one performer that will go down in the annals of musical theatre history.

Strong support is given by Andy Hockley (Firmin) and Simon Green (Andre) who mould into the roles of the pompous theatre owners with wonderful nuanced comedy, whilst Elizabeth Sharp is captivatingly cold and stern as the ballet mistress Madame Giry.

The Phantom of the Opera 25th Anniversary tour is “Phantastic” from start to finish and brings a unique and original approach to this much loved and critically applauded production. Highly worthy of its standing ovation all I can say is “Brava! Brava!”

Runs until 19th May 2012 before continuing its UK Tour.
This is my street, I smile at the faces I've known all my life, They regard me with pride.

#303 achilles

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:19 PM

yes the towering set is sensational, but not ideal for theatres such as the Palace. The over hang of the gallery and circle prevent a good third of the audience seeing the action at the top of the wall....a shame as some good stuf is going on up there. As yes the chandelier is thoughtfully lowered at the start so everyone, almost everyone, gets to see it once, but then it's gone for much of the audience.I think those are the only main sightline issues, but they are pretty significant ones. I love how the playing area goes from epic to intimate in seconds, and how the set contains a good few surprises.

#304 bickypeg

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 07:12 AM

.

#305 bickypeg

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 07:18 AM

View PostLaughingmonsta, on 10 April 2012 - 11:08 PM, said:

<br />My Review of the show from Tonight in Manchester<br /><br />Just over 25 years ago, Andrew Lloyd Webber alongside producer Cameron Mackintosh opened a musical in London based on Gaston Leroux's famous novel 'Le Fantome de l'Opera'. Lloyd Webber created the show as a personal love letter to his then wife Sarah Brightman. It was no surprise that the show was a critical success and one could almost argue that the musical already has a definitive staging, but director Laurence Connor has once again proved after his success with re-staging Les Miserables in 2010 that with careful thought and a sharp eye for detail anything is possible.<br /><br />Throwing caution to the wind, Connor has changed almost every part of this epic musical's staging, for all those minute plot holes that hung around the original's neck are here delt with logical direction and precision, the characters that populate this production feel more rounded, more grounded and above all more believable because of it, the journey to the Phantom's liar being of one particular highlight. Add to the already heady mix, a set design which quite frankly dwarfs the London original, it firmly places us deep within the structure of Paris' Opera Populaire; from the stage, dressing rooms and damp, dark and mysterious catacombs far below ground level Paul Brown's rotating set is a perfect centrepiece to anchor all the action. In honour of the late Maria Bjornson her costume designs are vividly realised in a bright array of stunning attire, that add another dimension to this staggering production. Paule Constable creates a deliciously eerie atmosphere with her striking lighting design, whilst Lloyd Webbers soaring and emotional score is powerfully commanded by the able hand of Anthony Gabrielle.<br /><br />At the centre of this new production are three veterans of the London production, in the role of Christine is Katie Hall who surprised many 2 years ago with her portrayal of Cossette in Connor's production of Les Miserables. Here Hall proves that she is every bit a leading lady, not only do her strong soprano vocals fill the large auditorium but her characterisation is full of depth, making the final scene even more powerful and emotive than I can ever recall. Simon Bailey returns to play the part of Raoul, as devilishly distinguished as ever before, he fills the shoes of the Vicomte de Chagny with charm and panache and thanks to Connor's new direction a more centred passion and anger throughout.<br /><br />But it takes a performer of real gravitas and charisma, a performer who understands that a role requires depth and understanding, that just singing a role is not sufficient in musical theatre to take on the role of the enigmatic Erik. The part is bestowed on the sensational John Owen-Jones, who will very soon become the actor to have played the Phantom on more occasions than any other performer in the world. Owen-Jones' portrayal of the tortured and disfigured Opera Ghost is on one hand tender and sensitive, whilst on the other wrapped full of rage, jealousy and bitterness. Arguably Owen-Jones is THE musical actor of his generation and one performer that will go down in the annals of musical theatre history.<br /><br />Strong support is given by Andy Hockley (Firmin) and Simon Green (Andre) who mould into the roles of the pompous theatre owners with wonderful nuanced comedy, whilst Elizabeth Sharp is captivatingly cold and stern as the ballet mistress Madame Giry.<br /><br />The Phantom of the Opera 25th Anniversary tour is "Phantastic" from start to finish and brings a unique and original approach to this much loved and critically applauded production. Highly worthy of its standing ovation all I can say is "Brava! Brava!"<br /><br />Runs until 19th May 2012 before continuing its UK Tour.<br />
<br /><br /><br />


Wow what a review!I can't wait!

#306 Titan

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 10:59 AM

Is there a souvenir brochure out yet?

#307 London-phan

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 11:39 AM

John Owen jones won't become to the actor to play role more than any other actor for quite a while and it won't be during this tour. He will hit his 2000th performance in may, and that's still around 700 performances less than Peter Karrie who has played the role more than any other actor.

#308 SHk

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 04:55 PM

View PostBricabrac, on 10 April 2012 - 06:30 PM, said:

<br />He can if he uses bad judgement as he might have done in this scene.<br />&quot;Kind hearted&quot; is hardly all that Christine was at the unmasking in the original. She was also disillusioned because she had been lied to and suckered down into the Opera House cellars by someone she naïvely had thought was, perhaps, an angel sent by her father. She now knows he's just a man, and if she is POd, I can't blame her.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Oh no no. How come it is a bad judgement?

#309 Bricabrac

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:36 PM

View PostSHk, on 11 April 2012 - 04:55 PM, said:

<br /><br /><br />

Oh no no. How come it is a bad judgement?

It might not be. I don't know yet as I have neither seen the Tour nor have I read a really detailed account of what happens in the first scene down in the Lair. I was responding to this:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QUOTE:  As for the un-masking, again I too appreciate that it was there in the respected film version, but it's a NEW production.  So the director should not be blamed for creating his own version of the same story because that's exactly what he was paid to do, I imagine.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A director of any production, new or not, can be blamed if he doesn't make good choices. Being hired doesn't mean he is infallible.

I am concerned that having the Phantom unmasked earlier in the scene that has been the case might not be a good idea, but I need more information to have a firm opinion

--By the way, if the poster was referring to the 2004 film version, it was hardly universally respected. It got many bad reviews, and a lot of Phantom of the Opera fans didn't like it..

#310 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 06:34 PM

SPOILER: RE UNMASKING

In the tour he isn't unmasked - whilst Christine is asleep - the Phantom tends to his seeping wounds (Its all their in the lyrics)Christine awakes and see his mask and this intrigues her to see the person who hides the mask, turning him around and thus the rest is pretty similar!

It works very well and actually makes more sense within the narrative structure of the piece
This is my street, I smile at the faces I've known all my life, They regard me with pride.




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