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Les Mis Movie


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#801 tommo2k

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 07:26 PM

View PostMagic Hour, on 10 March 2013 - 06:59 PM, said:

I bought my US Blu-ray/DVD/Digital/UV copy on Friday in a London DVD store. Haven't watched all the extras yet, but the Blu-Ray looks amazing and I can report that the HD copy is Region free - so will play on UK Blu-Ray players, if you don't want to wait.
Which store? How much was it?

#802 Magic Hour

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:59 PM

View Posttommo2k, on 10 March 2013 - 07:26 PM, said:

Which store? How much was it?

Cinema Store, St Martin's Late. Expect to pay around £30 (I negotiated lower cause I'm a regular).

#803 musicalover

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 04:29 PM

I so agree with the member who said that Hugh Jackman sounded harsh. I too have listened to the Ramin Karimloo sing "Brin Him Home," so I was sort of shocked at Hugh's tone. Ramin puts so much emotion in the song; I am planning on traveling to Toronto to see his Jean Valjean once more. I also agree that Ann Hathaway was outstanding.

#804 Carmella1

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:40 PM

Not only Ramin.  I could name quite a few that have sung this better.  He is not the only one who sings the song, nor the only JVJ.  I actually was not that impressed when I saw his JVJ.  

I was very disappointed in HJ's though.  Totally not a song he should sing way, out of his comfort range.

#805 Cactus

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:51 PM

Most Valjeans I've seen on stage (including a bunch of first and second covers) sang BHH with more subtlety and pitch than Hugh Jackman...

#806 Nicholas

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 01:44 AM

I was having a pretty much identical conversation the other day, so my two pennies.  Musicals are, ultimately, about creating a world where characters bursting into song seems natural.  The stage musical creates a semi-operatic world requiring louder, more technically accomplished voices.  The film musical creates a world like David Lean does in Dr Zhivago.  Thus the stage musical requires better pitch and technique because that's the JVJ of that world, whilst the film JVJ requires, for Bring Them Home, someone who is entirely out of their comfort range.  Hugh Jackman's very accomplished and could have performed that song, albeit perhaps not as good as a West End star, pretty easily on the ears.  That wouldn't have fitted into the Tom Hooper Les Mis world.  Not everyone agrees with me on that stylistic point, and those that do don't necessarily agree that it technically works, but for my money this Les Mis film was better for the flawed singing because the world created upon entering the cinema was one not of operatic voices and tonality but of fairly raucous, untrained singing - I've said before that the "Do You Hear The People Sing" most resembles not a moment from a musical but that moment in Zulu when they all start singing Men of Harlech, and in many ways the Les Mis film is a two and a half hour extension of that need to express violence, fear, sadness etc through song, whether or not a singer.  Anne Hathaway's brilliant because at that moment in this grotty world to belt like Patti LuPone would be insincere, but on stage (at least, on stage under Nunn and Caird) it'd be insincere not to express those emotions with grandeur.

Just to clarify, I'm not saying Hugh Jackman's better than others, nor that his is by definition more emotional because it's 'real' (because, obviously, the emotions a grander singer puts in are equally real), but I'm saying that purer version wouldn't have worked for this film.  But I did think Hugh was fab in the film.  A fair comparison would be the moment of the barricades - on stage it's a goosebump-inducing moment of set design that I've not seen for 15 years or so and remember, and in the film it's a moment of character unity where a combined good has very small acts - the giving away of a chair or suchlike - combining to a grand moment - goosebump inducing but for different reasons.  The stage barricade has the edge, but that's not to devalue how brilliant the film barricade was.

It's late.  I'm tired.  I ramble.  Sorry.

#807 DeNada

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:14 AM

While I appreciate your explanation, I have it on fairly good authority that Hugh Jackman simply can't sing in falsetto - doesn't know how, and they didn't have time to teach him.  So he had to sing Bring Him Home in full voice, and that's why it sounds like it does in the film, not for any great artistic reasons!

It's unfortunate that what is frequently the "best" moment for Valjeans in the stage show is his weakest in the film - but his overall performance is otherwise excellent and he deserved every accolade he won or was nominated for.

#808 SSB

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:55 AM

View PostNicholas, on 09 August 2013 - 01:44 AM, said:

I was having a pretty much identical conversation the other day, so my two pennies.  Musicals are, ultimately, about creating a world where characters bursting into song seems natural.  The stage musical creates a semi-operatic world requiring louder, more technically accomplished voices.  The film musical creates a world like David Lean does in Dr Zhivago.  Thus the stage musical requires better pitch and technique because that's the JVJ of that world, whilst the film JVJ requires, for Bring Them Home, someone who is entirely out of their comfort range.  Hugh Jackman's very accomplished and could have performed that song, albeit perhaps not as good as a West End star, pretty easily on the ears.  That wouldn't have fitted into the Tom Hooper Les Mis world.  Not everyone agrees with me on that stylistic point, and those that do don't necessarily agree that it technically works, but for my money this Les Mis film was better for the flawed singing because the world created upon entering the cinema was one not of operatic voices and tonality but of fairly raucous, untrained singing - I've said before that the "Do You Hear The People Sing" most resembles not a moment from a musical but that moment in Zulu when they all start singing Men of Harlech, and in many ways the Les Mis film is a two and a half hour extension of that need to express violence, fear, sadness etc through song, whether or not a singer.  Anne Hathaway's brilliant because at that moment in this grotty world to belt like Patti LuPone would be insincere, but on stage (at least, on stage under Nunn and Caird) it'd be insincere not to express those emotions with grandeur.

Just to clarify, I'm not saying Hugh Jackman's better than others, nor that his is by definition more emotional because it's 'real' (because, obviously, the emotions a grander singer puts in are equally real), but I'm saying that purer version wouldn't have worked for this film.  But I did think Hugh was fab in the film.  A fair comparison would be the moment of the barricades - on stage it's a goosebump-inducing moment of set design that I've not seen for 15 years or so and remember, and in the film it's a moment of character unity where a combined good has very small acts - the giving away of a chair or suchlike - combining to a grand moment - goosebump inducing but for different reasons.  The stage barricade has the edge, but that's not to devalue how brilliant the film barricade was.

It's late.  I'm tired.  I ramble.  Sorry.

Great analysis!! Having driven the 'Barricades' on stage for many years back in the day I take this as a personal complement too!! lol :)

#809 poster J

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 11:15 PM

My problem with Bring Him Home isn't that it's uneasy on the ears (yes, Jackman does completely ruin the whole song and somehow make those beautiful lyrics sound awful, but if it had worked in the context it would have possibly been acceptable) but that it's so damn loud!  It's a prayer, the lyrics are a prayer and the situation in the movie at that point calls for something soft and pleading, not yelled in anger.  Valjean is pleading with God, not berating him.




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