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Oliver! The Musical


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#11 Guest_guest56_*

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 03:45 AM

Any reviews of the first preview tonight ??

#12 Guest_Giggleboy_*

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 08:00 PM

QUOTE(guest56 @ Dec 14 2008, 03:45 AM) View Post
Any reviews of the first preview tonight ??



Have posted this in another topic. Am I allowed to cut and paste it here?

No one post only please. Otherwise it dilutes replies and clutters the board. I think your review is best placed here so I will delete the other one and leave a link to this.

regards, Viceroy


Laurence was great - a beautifully produced singing voice and perfectly good acting. Ross McCormack as Dodger was excellent and so were the Gang. The children were fabulously well rehearsed which couldn't always be said of the adults or moving parts.

I agree with the previous poster about some of the supporting roles. Ham, ham ham. Massively energeitc big numbers.I think the punters will love the show it was always going to be a revival of the previous production but I went to see 'Six Characters in Search of an Author' and I really did think Rupert Goold would bring something chilling, exciting, risk taking and original!!! It couldn't have been more different a theatrical experience. My biggest beef is that Bill Sykes is played so much of a charicature you simply cannot believe than anyone would could have any sort of relationship with him. There is no rapport or anything between him and Jodie or him and Bullseye - (who looks as though he has been lovingly groomed for Crufts by his owner in the wings and should definitely be scruffed up a bit and look a bit more kicked about). Perhaps they think it would be un pc to give a wife murderer any sort of third dimension (something the critics have discussed in relation to Carousel). This makes it very hard for Jodie as Nancy to be believable when she sings her big number. Gorman plays Sykes as just revolting and barrel chested without any of the animal magnetism of Oliver Reed in the role. I really think this is hard on Jodie and I think it would still have been just as problematic had Jessie (who I loved in ALNM) been cast. Maybe they can do something about this and the way Sykes brings his dog on stage on a lead(!) and politely hands him over to a dog-minding serving wench. It looked ridiculous!

Will go again and look forward to changes.

Oh, almost forgot to say Atkinson's performance was a comic tour de force. Worth seeing the show for him alone.




Another thing, Rupert/Cameron, if you are reading this...I have seen an amateur production where Mrs Bedwin sings the reprise of 'Where is Love' in the room with a SLEEPING Oliver and it was the most moving point of the show. Having Mrs B cuddled up all cosy and practically in bed with a wide awake Oliver didn't work for me and kind of anticipated the happy ending too much (not that we're exactly in suspense!). Oliver needs to be asleep in that scene, please. Would have liked to have seen Rosemary Leech but Louise Gold showed her versatility. I know you'd need to alternate the portraits to resemble the three different Olivers but as the rest of the production was so literal I would've like to have seen a likeness of Agnes up on the wall, rather than imagined (a detail you probably can't do much about now for design reasons)
The scene where Nancy recaptures Oliver doesn't work on that travelator, so you need to do something about that. Much better to do that on the passerelle and just cut to them being in the den. Thanks and best wishes.

#13 Guest_Giggleboy_*

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 09:01 AM

....the production eeks out every bit of sexual inuendo that can be derived from the scene with Mr Bumble and Widow Corney AND (very soon after)  between Noah Claypole and Charlotte. However there is no point I can remember, in scene he first comes in, where Sikes even notices Nancy. Of course Nancy is deluded about Sikes but I think you do have to believe she's not just an onlooker and that on some base level he needs her to believe Nancy when she's singing about it. Wanna see Tamsin now and see if I feel any different about it.

#14 Guest_Giggleboy_*

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 09:22 AM

QUOTE(Giggleboy @ Dec 15 2008, 09:01 AM) View Post
....the production eeks out every bit of sexual inuendo that can be derived from the scene with Mr Bumble and Widow Corney AND (very soon after)  between Noah Claypole and Charlotte. However there is no point I can remember, in scene he first comes in, where Sikes even notices Nancy. Of course Nancy is deluded about Sikes but I think you do have to believe she's not just an onlooker and that on some base level he needs her to believe Nancy when she's singing about it. Wanna see Tamsin now and see if I feel any different about it.



I don't mean the scene he first comes on, I mean the scene in the Three Cripples.

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 09:24 AM

I saw the opening night preview - and having never seen the show before - came away somewhat disappointed. This is by no means a reflection on the cast -- but more so commentary on the actual show / story itself. The musical comes across as 'light hearted candyfloss' ... all dressing - no substance - and wholly unfulfilling. Sure, its a lot of fun - but nothing more.

Rowan Atkinson is superb - but everything about the show just strikes me as "pantomime" and oh-so British ... has the show ever played Broadway ? What was the US response ?

It comes no where close in creating the sheer grit & emotion of Billy Elliot for example. Be very interested to see how long the show plays with the current climate ... advance sales must have been enormous - but thereafter it shall be interesting.


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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:27 AM

I have not seen this production but the original 60's production of Oliver was nothing but a huge triumph and also very well received on Broadway. If directed and cast correctly it is certainly a lot more than just "candy fluff". I am intrigued now to see this current version to see what gave you that idea about the show. Sure, it's not as dark and gritty as the original black and white film (which was marvellous) but - it's certainly more than just light-hearted fun if produced properly. Also - the music is surely classes above that of Billy Elliott, which is really quite forgettable and the weakest part of the (otherwise very good) show.

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:34 AM

What happened to Rosemary Leach who wassupposed to be playing Mrs Bedwin?

#18 Guest_guest_*

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:38 AM

QUOTE(Giggleboy @ Dec 15 2008, 09:01 AM) View Post
....the production eeks out every bit of sexual inuendo that can be derived from the scene with Mr Bumble and Widow Corney AND (very soon after)  between Noah Claypole and Charlotte. However there is no point I can remember, in scene he first comes in, where Sikes even notices Nancy. Of course Nancy is deluded about Sikes but I think you do have to believe she's not just an onlooker and that on some base level he needs her to believe Nancy when she's singing about it. Wanna see Tamsin now and see if I feel any different about it.


I don't think you will be disappointed with Tasmin, she looks amazing, she is the only one I will go and see, she look right.

#19 Weez

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:45 AM

I can't say I remember any grit or real emotion in 'Billy Elliot'. A lot of forced over-sentimental gauche emotion, but hardly the moving experience of the original movie. Although that doesn't mean I'm not a fan of the show... o_O

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#20 Guest_Giggleboy_*

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 12:02 PM

QUOTE(Guest @ Dec 15 2008, 11:27 AM) View Post
I have not seen this production but the original 60's production of Oliver was nothing but a huge triumph and also very well received on Broadway. If directed and cast correctly it is certainly a lot more than just "candy fluff". I am intrigued now to see this current version to see what gave you that idea about the show. Sure, it's not as dark and gritty as the original black and white film (which was marvellous) but - it's certainly more than just light-hearted fun if produced properly. Also - the music is surely classes above that of Billy Elliott, which is really quite forgettable and the weakest part of the (otherwise very good) show.


Maybe because in the 1960s it was so original and now we have all seen the film and know the tunes backwards it doesn't have the same impact. I really hoped Rupert Goold would do something fantastic with it though. Is he just there for the cash? Hasn't Cameron given him any scope?
The stage seemed very deep (amazing perspectives) but lacking the massive width of the Palladium, so actually still a bit cramped to me! I didn't see the Palladium production (except on Youtube). I was yearning for something to happen in the auditorium - maybe for characters to enter from the back of the stalls or Billes Sikes death to be staged hanging off a box or something exciting. (They managed that incredible proscenium arch walk in Mary Poppins, after all) Even, like the nuns in SOM or the animals in 'Lion King' , to have the workhouse kids enter up the aisles of the stalls would be good. Just something that would give me a frisson and a sense of drama, originality, life, connection with the audience. Didn't Lionel Bart's original show spring up from real gritty, Brechtian roots? I am afraid, if they don't do something about it (there's still time, Cameron)  this production is going to be pap for the IDA punters. Give me the thrill I've had watching things at the Newbury Watermill or Chocolate Factory or even the local village hall, please! I'm afraid Billy Eliot didn't really do it for me either so perhaps I should just avoid big theatres.




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