Jump to content


- - - - -

Shows and Star Performances.


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
94 replies to this topic

#11 Matthew Winn

Matthew Winn

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 2898 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bletchley

Posted 08 March 2007 - 09:40 AM

QUOTE(armadillo @ Mar 7 2007, 07:25 PM) View Post
Am I the only person to admit to often wanting to see a particular person?

No, you're not. Almost all my theatregoing is based around wanting to see people whose work I've enjoyed in the past or who I think show particular promise. The last time I saw something because of the production itself rather than the people involved was Love Song in January. Before that it was 5/11 (August 2005) and The Shaughraun (July 2005). So it's perhaps once in every fifty to a hundred shows I won't be wanting to see specific people.

However, the difference between me and most people is that I accept that sometimes life doesn't work out quite how I hope, and I don't go around believing that the law gives me a legal right to have everything turn out perfectly. If someone takes four weeks holiday and one week sick leave a year I have a 10% chance of missing them. That's just the way things are.
I have always hated eggs. I remember back when I was a sperm I tried to head-butt one. It did not end well.

#12 Marius

Marius

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 368 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Southampton

Posted 08 March 2007 - 09:59 AM

for me I see a show for varies reasons, sometimes the show itself, and sometimes for who is in it (this doesnt mean a 'star' name always, it can mean a musical theatre star or even an ensemble member).

I have been disappointed on a few occasions, but I take the attitude that at the end of the day you always take a risk and you cant expect to get your money back. I was really disappointed not to see Linzi Hateley in Chicago last year, only reason I went really. But her understudy was great and I enjoyed the show.

The problem is that some shows are purely sold on the star name, and its very obvious.  Glass MEnagerie, all posters are just of Jessica Lange with no relation to the show, Hayfever was all about Judi dench, Equus, and Sound Of Music is clearly selling on Connie as they MADE her as star for their production. So they have to expect a backlash if she cant perfrom. When a show is selling clearly on the star name the producers in my eyes have a responsibility to offer people a refund or alternative date. It is also very unfortunate that the other leads are off at the same time. But if the producers are going to sell their production almost like a concert, based on one persons name, then they have a responsibility to deliver as their selling the star, not the show.

It did always surprise me that they felt they needed this for The Sound Of Music as its such a well loved film people would have gone to see it anyway.

#13 Jaybee

Jaybee

    Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 08 March 2007 - 11:07 AM

Regardless of small print, I'd say that if your marketing is primarily, or solely, about a star, then that star is what you are advertising. If you fail to deliver, you ought to make a concession of some sort. We're talking 50 tickets here.

#14 Blue

Blue

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 318 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 08 March 2007 - 12:29 PM

There ought to be a free bar if an understudy is on. I'm sure that would quench all of the moaning.

#15 Biddy

Biddy

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 617 posts

Posted 08 March 2007 - 05:15 PM

QUOTE(Matthew Winn @ Mar 8 2007, 09:40 AM) View Post
Almost all my theatregoing is based around wanting to see people whose work I've enjoyed in the past or who I think show particular promise.


Me too:
my theatregoing is almost always based on who, rather than what.

I meet a lot of very talented drama students here in Cardiff, training at the Welsh College of Music & Drama,
and I try to keep track of their subsequent careers.

Along the way, I chance upon other good actors whose performances I enjoy,
so I try to see more of their shows too.

I also take an interest in the careers of talented musical theatre performers I've come across
in Cardiff's International Festivals of Musical Theatre -
especially performers I've met at BBC Radio 2 Voice of Musical Theatre competitions.

(I'm 'just' an avid member of the theatregoing public, not a producer or casting director - unfortunately!)

#16 inthestalls

inthestalls

    Newbie

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 08 March 2007 - 10:36 PM

I love theatre in all it's forms, but a 'star' does definately make me get the credit card out extra quick.  Although I'm disappointed when the 'star' is replaced by their understudy, I always route for the understudy to come shining through.  After all, there's nothing to beat live theatre.  The audiennce usually behave with the understudy, just to help them get through a performance.  
Basically anyone, star or star in waiting, who has the balls to do theatre, deserves our attention.

#17 David

David

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 445 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Camelot

Posted 08 March 2007 - 10:54 PM

QUOTE(Blue @ Mar 8 2007, 12:29 PM) View Post
There ought to be a free bar if an understudy is on. I'm sure that would quench all of the moaning.


At first I thought this was a great idea, then I remembered a story from the first few weeks of SOM's run about someone being punched in the balcony (euphemism?wink.gif).  Could only increase this sort of behaviour!

#18 Erin17

Erin17

    Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Interests:Musicals

Posted 09 March 2007 - 10:16 AM

It varies with me too.  Sometimes I want to go and see the show (I am booking to see Aspects of Love when it goes on tour and although I would like to see David Essex as Uncle George it won't be vital to my enjoyment).

I have seen many shows where the understudy has taken on the leading role and haven't worried too much about it.

However, we all have our favourites.  I specifically went to see Chitty Chitty Bang Bang because Michael Ball was in it.  This is a production I wouldn't have been interested in otherwise.  Luckily, I was not disappointed!

So I can definitely relate to severe disappointment when you get to the theatre (having spent a lot of money on travel and accommodation) not to find your favourite is appearing.

Still, people get sick and that's life and we have to accept it.

In the case of Lesley Garrett though, I too think it's a liberty to advertise her presence in SOM and then give her time off to make her utterly inane and ludicrously flattering comments about the singing "talents" of the Celebrity Fame Academy contestants.




#19 In the Know

In the Know

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London
  • Interests:Theatre, television, films, reading. travelling, politics and football

Posted 09 March 2007 - 10:30 AM

Have to say I think SOM (Sound of Music) stands alone as sooo many people go to see it because they feel they have put Conne in that role, with their telephone votes. In fact last time I saw it I was behind two old dears who were raving that it was "their" Connie.

Last time SOM was in town - the advance was no where near as great as it has been for the "Connie" performance.

Sadly "their" Connie was off but I felt the understudy Maria and Liesel were both amazing !

So IMHO - if you go to see a show , it should be made clear thats its the show they are paying to see.

Unless of course you go to see a show which the lead actress is chosen by the public, then they have the right to see that actress and if not a full refund should be given and tickets for another performance. I am sure with the profits they will make , the producers could get insurance to cover such an event.

#20 Polly1

Polly1

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 367 posts

Posted 09 March 2007 - 11:30 AM

QUOTE(Marius @ Mar 8 2007, 09:59 AM) View Post
The problem is that some shows are purely sold on the star name, and its very obvious.  Glass MEnagerie, all posters are just of Jessica Lange with no relation to the show, Hayfever was all about Judi dench, Equus, and Sound Of Music is clearly selling on Connie as they MADE her as star for their production. So they have to expect a backlash if she cant perfrom. When a show is selling clearly on the star name the producers in my eyes have a responsibility to offer people a refund or alternative date. It is also very unfortunate that the other leads are off at the same time. But if the producers are going to sell their production almost like a concert, based on one persons name, then they have a responsibility to deliver as their selling the star, not the show.


Exactly. Theatre producers are now reaping the whirlwind of taking celebrity casting to the ridiculous level that it has now reached. If they want the 'gain' of selling a show on a "celebrity" name, then thay have to take the 'pain' when that person doesn't appear. Maybe not legally, maybe not even morally, but for the sake of the continuation of the West End theatre business. There are only so many people - dedicated theatregoers like those who contribute to this discussion board - who will go to see a show and be understanding of the fact that sometimes, an understudy will appear (provided the 'star' is missing for genuine reasons and the performance is adequate - not like last week's fiasco at Equus). The majority of the public making a special (and very expensive) trip to see Connie or 'Harry Potter' would be devasted not to see them and without compensation, will NEVER return. Unfortunately, so-called celebrity casting seems to be the only way to sell shows and attract publicity, so we are stuck with it, but if the public don't get what they think they're paying for then they will vote with their feet.

BTW, I'm not saying that I don't go to shows to see a particular person - I do, but I go mostly to plays where the problem doesn't seem so rife. I do still get that knot of nervous tension arriving at the theatre and hoping not to see/hear the dreaded announcement.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users