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Comedy Of Errors

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#11 Honoured Guest

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 10:13 AM

View PostDavid J, on 29 July 2012 - 10:12 PM, said:

As an example, this production lacked a big chase sequence, which was quite a dissapointment. It would have been interesting to see how such an event can be performed on the thrust stage.

Why not cast Tom Daley and Pete Waterfield?

#12 David J

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Posted 30 July 2012 - 04:28 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 30 July 2012 - 06:35 AM, said:

So what ? All that is required is that the audience suspends their disbelief and accept that they look the same. If you were worried about that then you will have even more of an issue with Twelfth Night. Cross-casting three plays is hard enough without having to satisfy the literal-minded audience members.
As I said, this is the first time I have noticed this, having seen this play a number of times, and I am just pointing it out. As it is I have been both curious and apprehensive about changing genders during this season. The Comedy of Errors also demands more from the audience to suspend their disbelief, whilst I can look over the fact that it would be difficult to find an identical male and female for Twelfth Night. And from what I can see it was not a problem for Joe Dixon, Christopher Colquhoun, Jonathan Slinger and Forbes Masson from the 2005 Comedies ensemble to pull off the ilusion that they were identical.

View PostHonoured Guest, on 30 July 2012 - 10:13 AM, said:

Why not cast Tom Daley and Pete Waterfield?
Spoiler

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#13 Honoured Guest

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 04:52 PM

Nice to see the Courtyard Theatre on the Royal Shakespeare Theatre stage.

For the record, the two Dromios were obviously identical twins from their hair, clothes and birthmarks.

I liked it!

#14 Lynette

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 09:52 PM

I liked it too but then most of the play is director proof, isn't it? Talk about the dark side. That black bin liner wrapped body hauled up was a bit much. In days of yore I would have chosen this to take the kiddies to but this one would have taken a bit more explanation than usual and plenty of hot milk before bedtime. So ok it is for the grown ups.
Dromios good, but come on, one Antipholus was a foot shorter than the other. I suspended my whatsaname but still thought it was silly.
I didn't catch Twelfth Night but did see The Tempest. Too much iron work, can we move on from the industrial concept now please?

#15 BAGibb

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 06:04 PM

How big a budget do you think they have Lynette? They do the best with what they have in terms of set - the theme being a wreck, and seeing as the productions are all pretty much modern settings, there's going to be a few bits of iron.

#16 Lynette

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 10:00 PM

How much did that girder cost? Was it worth it? Only asking.

#17 David J

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 10:40 PM

If we think about this Shipwreck trilogy literally then the Comedy of Errors setting makes the most sense. The setting is an industrial dock, and you can see the netting, lifebuoys and immigrants coming in crates via the crane.

Twelfth Night would have to come second since it shows the twins clambering onto the beech, and a hotel does give the sense of travel (though that is stretching it a bit in this production).

The Tempest makes the least amount of sense. Yes it's an industrial site but it could have been anywhere and there is no sign of water anywhere.

In fact I must say I cannot see what was the point behind the two trilogies this year. For Nations at War, Richard III does not lend itself primarily to the theme very well, and both it and King John were a bit too light-hearted.
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#18 BAGibb

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 12:09 AM

Well it's not just a girder, it's a crane to fly in set pieces...so I imagine a fair pennys worth.

#19 Honoured Guest

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 09:51 AM

View PostDavid J, on 23 September 2012 - 10:40 PM, said:

In fact I must say I cannot see what was the point behind the two trilogies this year. For Nations at War, Richard III does not lend itself primarily to the theme very well, and both it and King John were a bit too light-hearted.

I suppose that they encourage people to see several plays. For example, most people were familiar with Richard III, or at least with the title, and so they may have been more likely to also see the less well-known King John and the new A Soldier in Every Son, knowing that they share a theme as well as the same group of actors. Last summer's plays in the first season of the reopened Swan and new Royal Shakespeare Theatre were deliberately all very different from each other, from different periods and with varied themes, direction, design, etc. That 2011 summer season showed the full range of the RSC's work (except for musicals and family shows which came immediately before with Matilda and after with The Heart of Robin Hood) but this summer the variety came with the many visiting World Shakespeare Festival productions while the RST and Swan both had their own ensemble, each  with a distinct project.

#20 David J

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 10:12 AM

View PostHonoured Guest, on 24 September 2012 - 09:51 AM, said:

I suppose that they encourage people to see several plays. For example, most people were familiar with Richard III, or at least with the title, and so they may have been more likely to also see the less well-known King John and the new A Soldier in Every Son, knowing that they share a theme as well as the same group of actors. Last summer's plays in the first season of the reopened Swan and new Royal Shakespeare Theatre were deliberately all very different from each other, from different periods and with varied themes, direction, design, etc. That 2011 summer season showed the full range of the RSC's work (except for musicals and family shows which came immediately before with Matilda and after with The Heart of Robin Hood) but this summer the variety came with the many visiting World Shakespeare Festival productions while the RST and Swan both had their own ensemble, each  with a distinct project.

You do have a point there, and isn't the rehearsals, and therefore the ideas, put forward after the seasons are announced?

In the end then it comes down to a season of plays with their own identities, some of which are connected by two sets story elements and companies.
My reviews can also be found at "A Night at the Theatre"

http://www.anightatthetheatre.co.uk/





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