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New Writing.


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#1 theatreliker

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 10:30 PM

Sorry if this is in the wrong section.
With new plays such as The Last of the Haussmans and Jumpy being about former hippies and generational divides along with Children's Children and Love Love Love having similar themes, is there a theme/ motif in new writing about age gaps or perhaps even anarchy and a resentment to the establishment? The new revival of What the Butler Saw would also confirm this hunger for some sort of anti-establishment theme?
2014 theatre: Blithe Spirit (Gielgud)  Booked: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (Savoy)  Waterbabies (Curve)  View from the Bridge (Young Vic)  Birdland (Royal Court).

#2 Honoured Guest

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:57 AM

Some drama is celebratory but most is oppositional. Some drama is highly original but most taps into the commonplace general discussion and commentary, like generational divide, often now with an economic focus, and environmental issues. What the Butler Saw was originally oppositional to the establishment in general and psychiatric orthodoxy in particular. However, it was also celebratory in spirit, reflecting Joe Orton's gloriously amoral hedonism. I'd say that the new revival focuses more on celebration than opposition because the play's issues are those of two generations ago, the biggest "name" actor is a comedian, and the marketing has attempted to associate the production with the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

Caryl Churchill has always been highly original, in form, theme and spirit, and I'm really eager to experience her new piece Love and Information at the Royal Court Theatre in September.

#3 armadillo

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:39 AM

It's always seemed to me that's there's a certain irony in charging people £50 to see something 'anti-establishment' ...

#4 Lynette

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 10:09 AM

Yes the best part of Jerusalem was knowing that everyone in the audience would have been down to the council and police station hotfoot if a Byron character were at the bottom of the garden. And we were paying in the region of £60 to be in the stalls cheering him on.

#5 armadillo

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:11 AM

View PostLynette, on 20 June 2012 - 10:09 AM, said:

Yes the best part of Jerusalem was knowing that everyone in the audience would have been down to the council and police station hotfoot if a Byron character were at the bottom of the garden. And we were paying in the region of £60 to be in the stalls cheering him on.

Yes, I saw it the weekend Dale Farm was cleared out and remember thinking about the contrast. If only the residents had got the Royal Court on their side. See also the 'anti-capitalism' of We Will Rock You.

#6 mallardo

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 02:24 PM

Trying to think of a pro-establishment play and can't come up with one, at least in the modern era.

But one of the things that impressed me about Antigone when I recently saw it was the fact that both sides of the political argument  get an intelligent airing.  Creon (establishment) certainly makes his points and makes them well as does Antigone (anti-establishment).  Perhaps this sort of thing went out with the Greeks.
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#7 Latecomer

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 02:44 PM

View PostLynette, on 20 June 2012 - 10:09 AM, said:

And we were paying in the region of £60 to be in the stalls cheering him on.

Not me.....got up before dawn, slogged down to London on cheap coach, queued in the cold for hours for £10 ticket. Front row seats and street cred intact. I kept the chilled prosecco for another day......and did buy £60 stalls tickets when it came around again! <_<

#8 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 03:46 PM

I lucked out and got freebies for Jerusalem - Front row - even more cred! ha ha
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#9 Honoured Guest

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 03:57 PM

The sleeping giant is by definiition the traditional establishment.

#10 Lynette

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 11:31 AM

Eh? You saying that Byron is calling on the Establishment to come to his aid? Don't think so. Have I misunderstood you.




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