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Eno's Dr Dee

Damon Albarns opera

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#1 SHk

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:06 AM

I saw this new "opera" last night. Who else has seen it?

My question is: Can this be called an opera when there was so little singing involved?

It was definintely very interesting visually, so if I see it as an experimental piece of theatre, I have no complaint, but call it an opera?

I have posted this comment here as the opera section seems to have disappeared.

#2 Honoured Guest

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 02:59 PM

Why would you want to post your comment in the opera section if you think Dr Dee isn't an opera?

#3 bickypeg

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 03:47 PM

Presumably because it was put on by English National Opera in their opera house?

#4 xanderl

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 04:03 PM

It sounds dire from the reviews
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#5 Honoured Guest

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:44 PM

I saw it last summer when it premiered at Manchester International Festival, the co-producer with ENO. Then, it was billed as "An English Opera by Damon Albarn & Rufus Norris", which emphasised the importance of the theatrical structure. I guess ENO insists on the primacy of the composer, because the billing in London is "Albarn's Dr Dee". To me, much of the staging was incomprehensible and the music was the main focus of interest. You could call it music theatre instead of opera but, whatever you call it, it wouldn't exist without Damon Albarn's music.

#6 Reich

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:17 AM

With the mixed reviews this really hasn’t proved to be the hit ENO was hoping for. Tickets prices went over the £100 mark for I think the first time in the company’s history, then it was discounted even before it opened.  Looking at the seating plan for the rest of the run, still lots of empty seats and even more discount codes flying around then you can shake a lute at <_<

Broadway has been very good to me. But then, I've been very good to broadway.


#7 Laughingmonsta

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:03 AM

I hated it in Manchester - obnoxious and self absorbed
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#8 zyx123

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 12:18 PM

Saw it in Manchester. Didn't have a clue what was going on for most it.

#9 FireFingers

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 02:58 PM

Saw this yesterday and found it very entertaining. I attended a pre-performance talk, and when asked on how to categorise the piece he talked about why it needed to be boxed in, it was undefinable. So the cast don't think of it an opera either.

#10 SHk

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:21 PM

View PostFireFingers, on 29 June 2012 - 02:58 PM, said:

Saw this yesterday and found it very entertaining. I attended a pre-performance talk, and when asked on how to categorise the piece he talked about why it needed to be boxed in, it was undefinable. So the cast don't think of it an opera either.

Ah, that makes me feel slightly better.

My other problems were: the lack of surtitle (they installed it in 2004), and the necessity to read the programme beforehand to understand the concept.  A genuinely powerful opera (and ballet) shouldn't need any explanation to be read before the show.

But then, they say it's not an opera, so.. it should be OK?




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