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A Doll's House - Young Vic & Duke Of Yorks

Cracknell & Stephens

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#11 popcultureboy

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 09:19 AM

I went last night again, having seen this last year. It is even more astonishing now than it was then. Which is saying something. Rank and Krogstadt were a letdown for me last time, this time they were in fine form. Dominic Rowan is very good, his drunk acting in Act Three is just top quality.

However, the show still belongs to Hattie Morahan who turns herself inside out as Nora. I'd been so ready to write her off as flappy of hands and generally unremarkable, and then she did this. It's an incredibly well measured, entirely believable, fully inhabited tour de force. Yes, she can be a little bit garbled and speedy in her delivery a couple of times, but I still managed to catch everything she said.

The applause last night was like being at a rock concert. People stamping and cheering and whistling, yet not one person stood up. Go figure. I hope this three week return isn't the end of the road for this production.

#12 Backdrifter

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:28 AM

Saw it Monday and thoroughly enjoyed it. Performances and design all top-notch. Easily the best production of this play I've seen, and the best performance I've seen HM give. I agree with the above comments, despite her speed of speaking sometimes, she was crystal clear throughout and her rapid delivery and gesticulating really conveyed the sense of a person almost radioactive with worry. I loved the contrast with how still and deliberate she becomes in her final speeches.

Was anyone else in on Monday who heard a phone going off in (I think) Act 1? I could hear it but it was thankfully not near me.

I booked it so long ago I forgot I had front row, and that it was only £10. It was nice to be reminded that, no matter what some might say or think, you can see great theatre in London for a tenner.

Plus I discovered Masters Super Fish on Waterloo Road, a few minutes walk around the corner from the Old Vic. It's among the very best fish & chips I've had. For £7.50 I got a selection of 4 types of fish with very good chips (and the batter was crisp and gorgeous), and at no extra cost you get ketchup and tartare sauce, onions and gherkins, plus on arrival you get given bread and butter and 3 shell-on prawns to nibble on. There are also grilled fish options for those who don't want deep-fried & battered. Its nearest rival in my experience is the functionally named The Fish & Chip Shop on George Street in Oban. Excellent, but not so handy for the Young Vic.

Terrific theatre and excellent cheap food all for under £20 (I sound like an advert now).
Turn up the signal... wipe out the noise

#13 Nicholas

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 07:11 PM

Bloody Nora!  One joy of being a slight distance from London is after a show there's time to let it settle and contemplate, and with that in mind I'm rather surprised by some of the muted responses.  Genuinely, I think this is one of the greatest and most astonishing pieces of theatre I have ever seen.  Upon seeing a great production, you go in thinking, being and feeling one thing and come out thinking, being and feeling another.  The last time I left the theatre like that - and the last time I left with my body physically shaking from the effect - was, I think, Jerusalem, and this (whisper it) might be even better.  For the last three hours I've been reliving, questioning, struggling, reminiscing.  This might just be one of those times where a piece of art seems to be speaking directly to me - I loved the set, I loved all performances, I loved the script and other parts people found problematic - but, for me, the stars aligned - play, performers, crew, version.  A truly great piece of theatre is like a new friend who'll visit you often, force you to question yourself and shape your decisions.  A Doll's House is, to me, one of those.

#14 popcultureboy

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:50 AM

My rhapsodic gushing about the production has sent three friends to see the return run of it, all of whom had the same reaction to it as you did, Nicholas. People being "meh" about this one really baffles me.

#15 Epicoene

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 12:02 PM

Particularly bad audience of immature teenagers whistling and giggling whenever there was an on-stage kiss - as tickets were hard to get it must have been their misguided parents or teachers to blame. Hattie M giving it the full Vanessa Redgrave to good effect. Supporting players good generally. Staging excellent.

#16 Ruperto

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 04:54 PM

I thought this was fantastic - so glad to have caught it. Hattie Morahan deserves all her awards and should have really got a standing ovation (I was at the front and too self-conscious to try to kick one off!). And as popcultureboy notes, Dominic Rowan is particularly good at doing drunk! I loved the almost cinematic scene changes with the spinning house set and music.

An obvious point to make, I know, but the play still feels so relevant in these austere times, not least because of its spotlight on family finances and borrowing to make ends meet etc - perhaps the money-lender Krogstad would be replaced by Wonga in a modern-day version? And I'm sure that in the week of Thatcher's funeral, I detected a little murmur in the audience when Nora tells her hubby that "I don't even really know what society is. I don't know if there's any such thing." Talking of Krogstad (Nick Fletcher), a colleague who went was disappointed that he wasn't more evil and menacing, whereas I quite liked the fact that he was this sort of chippy bloke from the office, a slightly pathetic, hard-done-by figure rather than some sort of over-the-top baddie...

#17 theatrepaul

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:51 PM

Having been blown away by this production last summer, I saw it again recently during its brief return to the Young Vic. If anything, Hattie Morahan' s Nora is even better this time. She goes from child like to sexual and suggestive, happy to desperate and horrified, capturing every aspect of this complex character quite brilliantly. Hattie as Nora remains for me one of the finest performances I've ever seen in my many years of theatre going. The upcoming Olivier award for Best Actress MUST be hers, there is no one who deserves it more.  




#18 Epicoene

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:00 PM

View PostRuperto, on 20 April 2013 - 04:54 PM, said:

And I'm sure that in the week of Thatcher's funeral, I detected a little murmur in the audience when Nora tells her hubby that "I don't even really know what society is. I don't know if there's any such thing."

That was a bit gratuitous, thrown in to pander to the chattering class audience, but it was a rare slip in a decent adaptation.

#19 popcultureboy

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:05 AM

Transferring to the Duke of York's after Passion Play. Hurrah!

#20 DrP

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:37 AM

Ooh is that definite?




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