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The Resistable Rise Of Arturo Ui (Chichester)


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#1 David J

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 11:04 PM


My knowledge of the Brechtian style came from drama in College, during which I saw my first Brechtian play on a trip to see the National Theatre's production of Mother Courage. In terms of a Brechtian production, I felt that it fell short in achieving the techniques required, leaving me disappointed.

My problem with Mother Courage was that although the production was making every effort to use Brechtian devices, including the placards, the sparse stage, and having the backstage team onstage, the rock music that was used turned the production into a rock concert. To me, this deviated away from one of Brecht's main techniques, which is not to make the audience emotionally evolved but provide a thought-provoking play, and I came out of Mother Courage with the music stuck in my head.


In comparison, this production uses the Brechtian techniques and got it right. Before the production starts the audience is introduced to a speakeasy, and onstage a band plays some imperceptable, but light hearted music, a tone that is used throughout the production to provide a contrast to the dark messages of the play. The play is introduced by a worker of the speakeasy, who mentions each main character involved in the upcoming events and their attributes, all of whom were sitting around the speekeasy.


Placards were not used, however the legends that told the rise of Hitler were included in the programme. The audience saw the cast bringing on and off pieces of the set, taking away any illusion of scene transition. What is more, it was interesting to see the connections between Arturo Ui and Adolf Hitler. Whilst the farcial elements made for some hilarious moments, by the second half it was clear that Arturo was becoming Hitler and the ending was shockingly provocative


Henry Goodman was great as Artuto Ui, and he did well in following the character's journey. The audience observed Arturo changing from a hunched, beady eyed, wreck, into a leader. However he was a leader who displayed paranoia as witnessed when he jumped at the sound of the piano he was trying to lean on, before he checked inside for a bomb.

Goodman's highlight came when he practiced Mark Antony's speech from Julius Caesar with an actor, in order to improve his appearance as a leader. He takes the actors instructions with glee, almost child-like, no matter how ridiculous they were, which made the scene hilarious. This was also the point that his gestuses were making it clear that he was becoming Hitler, to the point where he ended the scene goose-marching off stage whilst doing the heil salute, which was met with a round of applause.


Most of the cast members did not have a prominant role in the play, thus sticking to the Verfrumdungseffekt technique, however there were some who had their moments during the play. At first, William Gaunt was a puffed up, proud, and self-assured Dogsborough, who is followed everywhere by his weedy son, Young Dogsborough (James Northcote). Whilst he took a step back as Arturo began to take over, the second acts begins with his epitaph, in which he remorsefully regrets the decisions he had made earlier.


Lizzy McInnerny provided a humane perspective to the play. She performed a shocking scene in which she played a badly wounded woman who screams out for help in the streets after her family is shot down by mobsters. She later plays Betty Dullfoot, whose husband is killed for opposing Arturo. When forced to join Arturo's cause, she breaks down and pleads forgiveness from her deceased husband.


The set did well establishing the setting of Chicago's underworld. The background consisted of brick walls, metal gangways, fireescapes, archways, barred windows, air conditioning fans and alleyways. Yet the overall set was colored in black and shrouded in darkness, making it feel less naturalistic, and more minimal, whilst establishing the bleak world of Arturo Ui.


The Resistable Rise of Arturo Ui was a satisfying and thought provoking Brechtian production. It was so much better than the National Theatre's Mother Courage and is worth seeing at a Full Price


Full Price


My reviews can also be found at "A Night at the Theatre"

http://www.anightatthetheatre.co.uk/

#2 mallardo

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 07:44 AM

So, this production has now landed at the Duchess Theatre and it is indeed wonderful.  This small West End house is the perfect place for it and it has been remodeled for the occasion, a sloping runway being added right down the middle of the stalls along which characters make appropriately ominous entrances and exits.

I had never seen or read the play and had thought it would be a generalized satire on Hitler as an ambitious Chicago thug.  But, no.  It charts Hitler's rise in very precise terms, finding equivalents to most of his career highlights including the Reichstag fire, the Anschluss, the Night of the Long Knives, etc.  It is equally precise on the politics of the era; his adoption by the Trusts (here the Cauliflower Trust - it's all about vegetables) and his relationship with the aging Hindenberg (here Dogsborough). The parody elements are very sharp and, because of that, very funny.

The play is delivered in a blank verse translation which, I gather, is how Brecht wrote it and it is extremely well-handled by the large cast.  Of course, Arturo Ui himself dominates and Henry Goodman is superb, genuinely hilarious and terrifying at the same time.

Jonathan Church's production is excellent in every detail - I don't believe I have ever seen a better production of a Brecht play.  I got my tickets at TKTS and got great seats.  Highly recommended.
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#3 Abby

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 08:03 AM

Can I be very plebby and ask how you pronounce the title? Want to sound deeply intellectual when I ask for a ticket!

#4 mallardo

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 08:43 AM

View PostAbby, on 28 September 2013 - 08:03 AM, said:

Can I be very plebby and ask how you pronounce the title? Want to sound deeply intellectual when I ask for a ticket!

I had the same issue!  It is oo-ee.
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#5 xanderl

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 08:58 AM

You learn something every day! I always assumed it was 'wee'!
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#6 Abby

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 07:21 PM

Thanks - glad it's not just me...!

#7 Mrs Lovett's Meat Pie

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 09:22 PM

Question - the front row is 12 in advance, is it worth booking or wily I have take a load of neck painkillers b4 hand?


#8 Mrs Lovett's Meat Pie

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 09:22 PM

Question - the front row is 12 in advance, is it worth booking or wily I have take a load of neck painkillers b4 hand?


#9 mallardo

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 07:03 AM

I was not in the front row but it looked to be okay - the stage has not been raised for this production.
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#10 QuincyMD

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 09:37 AM

I know its there for dramatic purposes BUT I cant help but feel that the decision to have Goodman do Ui in the style of Marlon Brando in The Godfather for the first 45 minutes or so is a mistake.

I know the critics loved it but I found this a very long slog at 180 minutes with the references to 1930s Germany being as subtle as a sledgehammer to the knackers. For those, who unlike, havent studied German history then I suppose it was a just a parable about cauliflowers with Henry Goodman in a  Hitler tache but to me it was like a Channel 5 afternoon movie that rips off something more famous but which cant use the real names.
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