Jump to content


* * * * * 2 votes

A Chorus Line


  • Please log in to reply
740 replies to this topic

#331 frightenedrabbit

frightenedrabbit

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 27 February 2013 - 03:00 PM

I'm hoping to try for a day ticket this Friday, I'll be able to join the queue from 9.30. Will this be too late? What have people's experiences been with day tickets so far?

#332 west_london

west_london

    Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 27 February 2013 - 03:31 PM

View Postlesterf, on 27 February 2013 - 02:42 PM, said:

yes Seriously - have you never heard of show adaptations or rewrites ? It is not a huge change just an improvement in my opinion. It was originally written in 1975 so there is no reason 38 years later why you can not make some small changes .... audience expectations in 2013 are rather different to 1976 and productions have developed a hell of a lot since then.. a small change / changes I have mentioned will not take away anything from the feeling of  the production and might just add in a little more interest..


What you say makes no sense. The whole point of the show is to get the audience to connect with these 'faceless' ensemble members but this would never happen if there were the proverbial falling chandeliers and helicopters taking off to disctract us. When I saw the show last week, the whole audience was drawn in to point that at times you could hear a pin drop in the auditorium. The moment at the end when the lights around the proscenium came on (the simplest stage effect imaginable) produced a gasp and a cheer because it was like a tension had been released.  This is simply one of the most moving and at times devastating musicals in the West End at the moment...and you write it off because it doesn't have a flying car.

If 2013 audiences struggle with A Chorus Line then I think it says more about how lazy and fickle we have all become rather than how dated this show is.

#333 Jamiem

Jamiem

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 630 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 February 2013 - 03:52 PM

Nobody's going

#334 lesterf

lesterf

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:00 PM

View Postwest_london, on 27 February 2013 - 03:31 PM, said:

What you say makes no sense. The whole point of the show is to get the audience to connect with these 'faceless' ensemble members but this would never happen if there were the proverbial falling chandeliers and helicopters taking off to disctract us. When I saw the show last week, the whole audience was drawn in to point that at times you could hear a pin drop in the auditorium. The moment at the end when the lights around the proscenium came on (the simplest stage effect imaginable) produced a gasp and a cheer because it was like a tension had been released.  This is simply one of the most moving and at times devastating musicals in the West End at the moment...and you write it off because it doesn't have a flying car.

If 2013 audiences struggle with A Chorus Line then I think it says more about how lazy and fickle we have all become rather than how dated this show is.
I dont want flying cars , chandeliers and helicopters thats just plain ridiculous for a show like this .. you may notice I suggested some subtle not gimmicky changes as in the downstairs rehearsal room or a corridor or by the stage door or something along those lines but when you stump up £60 for a show I think you should get more than this

#335 mallardo

mallardo

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 893 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:15 PM

Lester, you don't seem to get how this or any show works.  You want a scene in the rehearsal hall downstairs where the cast are learning the lyrics to the song???  How exciting is that!  Does that give you more bang for your buck ( or pound)?  And would that be instead of or in addition to the Zack-Cassie scene and Paul's monologue which now occupy that spot onstage?  Do you want all of it or just the cast stuff BECAUSE IT'S ANOTHER SET?

Do you really not get that the bare stage with the white line is the essence of the show?  Do you really equate ticket prices with the opulence or otherwise of the set?  Honestly, it's a very odd and rather disturbing consumerist esthetic you are proposing.
Excuse me if I seem jejune
I promise I'll find my marbles soon.

#336 Titan

Titan

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3382 posts

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:30 PM

No sorry Mallardo Leserf has a point, it is about perceived value.  Quite rightly if ticket prices are the same as a bigger budget show the audience has the right to expect more, this is the downside to the increasing ticket prices, the audience will expect more for their money..  Of course you equat cost to a certain level of quality and 'bang for your buck', theatre is no different to any other walk of life.

#337 popcultureboy

popcultureboy

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 677 posts

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:31 PM

Quote

Honestly, it's a very odd and rather disturbing consumerist esthetic you are proposing.

It might be, but it's one that's becoming ever more prevalent. Joe Public will think "£65, but it's only two hours long and there's no set? I'm not paying it". Theatre prices in the West End have more than doubled in the last 15 years, while the quality of shows has, well, not. Unless a show is an event (like Book of Mormon) or has a big name or two in it (like The Audience), the outrageous prices (top price at the McAvoy Macbeth, with agency booking fee on top, is an unbelievable £81) are creating this kind of audience.

#338 Titan

Titan

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3382 posts

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:40 PM

Exactly, Im a theatre fan but no way will I be paying £65 for Chorus Line, ill do day seats or a deal.  If you think of theatre like another other expense/purchase, am I getting the best value for money? What else can I see for £65

Book of Mormon (an event, a brand name from its creators etc)
Charlie and Chocolate Factory (a known product name, spectacle)
Bodyguard (a known film, good famous songs)

Chorus Line (no star names, unknown songs to many people, no spectacle, short performance length compared to other shows)

#339 lesterf

lesterf

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 February 2013 - 04:52 PM

I agree with much of what Titan is saying ...I go to a lot of plays and musicals .. many times with no preconceptions but some expectations... I do also go to a fair few fringe productions with good but lesser known names ... I agree on the price issue .. I went with some expectations with it being at the Palladium,the advertising in the newspapers and underground and television glimpses and looking at the website seeing production photos all pointed to it looking very glamourous.... NO I wasn't expecting chandeliers and helicopters - I do know some of the songs - ONE for example and it was okay but a lot of it was whispered/spoken in the background

#340 jaqs

jaqs

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 900 posts

Posted 27 February 2013 - 05:11 PM

http://www.telegraph...the-scenes.html




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users