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Rsc 2013 Season


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#101 Parsley

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:45 AM

Since general members booking opened on Monday most weekend performances for Richard II are nearly sold out.

It also seems that the Mantel double bill might well be a huge success too as lots of the double-bill days are also now heavily booked.

I have to say that the 2013 winter season is going to be a mammoth box office for the RSC.

What with this and Matilda their fortunes really have turned around for the foreseeable future.

#102 Epicoene

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:03 AM

Booked Barbican Richard II today before the 10:00am time at which they said booking would open. Always worth a try isn't it ?

#103 Latecomer

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 10:07 AM

View PostEpicoene, on 08 March 2013 - 10:03 AM, said:

Booked Barbican Richard II today before the 10:00am time at which they said booking would open. Always worth a try isn't it ?

They are always early.....happened on Monday too....

#104 maggiem

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

View PostParsley, on 06 March 2013 - 10:45 AM, said:

Since general members booking opened on Monday most weekend performances for Richard II are nearly sold out.

You're not kidding, love!

I logged on at 10:00 am on Monday and just managed to get a £14 restricted view ticket for a Saturday matinee in October.

#105 Epicoene

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:21 PM

View Postmaggiem, on 08 March 2013 - 03:00 PM, said:

You're not kidding, love!

I logged on at 10:00 am on Monday and just managed to get a £14 restricted view ticket for a Saturday matinee in October.

How come there are any restricted view seats in a brand-new purpose-built theatre ?

#106 peggs

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 07:27 PM

We think it's pillars from looking at plans (£14 restricted too) but I take your point about why they exist in the first place. I haven't been so can anyone shed any light? Am hoping they're not too restricted.

#107 David J

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:27 PM

I did sit at the back of the stalls at the side for The Winters Tale. Thankfully the pillars were not in my way but the problem is that the balcony above me cut off anything that was above the stage, including half the projections and any action on top of the tower.

Those seats would be aright if the action took place on the stage only, but I would rather sit in the balconies next time
My reviews can also be found at "A Night at the Theatre"

http://www.anightatthetheatre.co.uk/

#108 igb

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:54 AM

View Postpeggs, on 08 March 2013 - 07:27 PM, said:

We think it's pillars from looking at plans (£14 restricted too) but I take your point about why they exist in the first place. I haven't been so can anyone shed any light? Am hoping they're not too restricted.

Yeah, it's really odd.  The balcony in the new RST actually has more supports than the equivalent places in the Courtyard.  There's some really weird commentary in the "Transformation" book (which is at home, but I'll edit the quote in when I get back to the house) to the effect that although cantilevering the balconies would have been practical from an engineering perspective, it wouldn't have had the same aesthetic effect.  Voluntarily having restricted view seats in order to pander to the desires of architects does seem odd in the extreme.  There probably wasn't the strength in the vertical parts of the Courtyard to do it, but quite clearly you can cantilever three rows of seats off the walls of the RST.  It's all rather odd.

#109 peggs

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:35 PM

View Postigb, on 11 March 2013 - 11:54 AM, said:

Yeah, it's really odd.  The balcony in the new RST actually has more supports than the equivalent places in the Courtyard.  There's some really weird commentary in the "Transformation" book (which is at home, but I'll edit the quote in when I get back to the house) to the effect that although cantilevering the balconies would have been practical from an engineering perspective, it wouldn't have had the same aesthetic effect.  Voluntarily having restricted view seats in order to pander to the desires of architects does seem odd in the extreme.  There probably wasn't the strength in the vertical parts of the Courtyard to do it, but quite clearly you can cantilever three rows of seats off the walls of the RST.  It's all rather odd.
Will try and remember to appreciate the aesthetic beauty if I can't see what's going on, on the stage!

#110 David J

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:56 PM

I have a problem with the aesthetics of the new layout of the building itself.

I am sure its nice to see the original walls and how far back the seats in the original theatre went, but those walls also divides what could have been a large foyer space around the RST. As a result the cafe has limited seats because of the limited space. Also if you are not familiar with the layout, its like going through a maze in order to find the right door to auditorium when going to your seat.
My reviews can also be found at "A Night at the Theatre"

http://www.anightatthetheatre.co.uk/




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