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Globe 2013

strange connections

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#11 dude-1981

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 11:04 PM

I didn't know about H6 until I read your post & went to the Globe website to work out what you meant.

As such, I take back everything I said. I was half expecting/hoping for 6 after we got 4 & 5 the last two years. Three new shows for me next year then.
If, for some strange reason you care what I've seen, it's all here:

http://pcchan1981.livejournal.com/

#12 Duncan

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:55 PM

View PostLynette, on 16 October 2012 - 03:28 PM, said:

From the Globe email.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest and Macbeth, the three plays of Shakespeare’s which deal most directly with the supernatural, will sit at the heart of the season. Three new plays will receive world premières - The Lightning Child by Che Walker, with music by Arthur Darvill, Blue Stockings by Jessica Swale, and Gabriel by Samuel Adamson, a celebration of the transporting power of the trumpet, featuring English trumpet soloist, Alison Balsom. Twice crowned 'Female Artist of the Year' at the Classic BRIT Awards, Alison has cemented an international reputation as one of classical music's great ambassadors, and is ranked among the most distinctive and innovative musicians on the international circuit today.


Interesting connection made between the Shakespeares. Why do they do this? For the RSC it was all about shipwrecks and they put The Tempest in there. You could put MND in any number of categories. Why don't they come clean and say, hey, this is what we are gonna do cos we have the directors in place, the actors can make it and we have the props!
New plays: can't work out if the trumpet one is a musical, a comcert or a play with music.

Anyone know more?

An odd collection of plays, puzzling especially because of the return of Macbeth so soon after the 2010 production.

But these plays all have one thing in common. They would all be ideal productions to perform indoors at the new Indoor Jacobean Theatre opening in late 2013.

It is possible that one or more of them will open the new indoor playhouse so that the Globe can experiment with transferring an outdoor production into the smaller indoor space. This must be an experiment they are keen to conduct, and they are uniquely placed to explore that period in theatre history when such transfers took place.

#13 xanderl

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:53 PM

Roger Allam is playing Prospero
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#14 Lynette

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:06 PM

Sold to the lady!

#15 armadillo

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:15 PM

View PostLynette, on 05 December 2012 - 07:06 PM, said:

Sold to the lady!

Though I'm sure I saw him first! Splendid casting - The Tempest at the Globe is a truly magical experience on a nice evening

#16 Epicoene

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:15 PM

View PostDuncan, on 22 November 2012 - 11:55 PM, said:

But these plays all have one thing in common. They would all be ideal productions to perform indoors at the new Indoor Jacobean Theatre opening in late 2013.

Why "ideal" ?

#17 Duncan

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:26 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 06 December 2012 - 01:15 PM, said:

Why "ideal" ?

The Tempest was designed for indoor performance. The version of Macbeth that has come down to us was most likely adapted for indoor performance (Lady M's candle in the wind). And Dream has ending with fairies magically lighting the interior of a house, which would look good indoors.

#18 Lynette

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:43 PM

Well, they're all in and out. Something like The Duchess of Malfi would work well. It is the post Bard repertoire the indoor theatre is really designed for. But I agree, Macbeth would work.

#19 Epicoene

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 08:55 AM

View PostDuncan, on 06 December 2012 - 07:26 PM, said:

The Tempest was designed for indoor performance. The version of Macbeth that has come down to us was most likely adapted for indoor performance (Lady M's candle in the wind). And Dream has ending with fairies magically lighting the interior of a house, which would look good indoors.

Maybe. But you could make as case for nearly all the plays in the same way. Measure for Measure (all scenes are indoors), Henry VIII (famously an indoor production originally), Pericles, Cymbeline (designed for indoor performance) and so on. Which ones would not be especially suitable for indoors ?

#20 Duncan

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 09:22 AM

View PostEpicoene, on 07 December 2012 - 08:55 AM, said:

Maybe. But you could make as case for nearly all the plays in the same way. Measure for Measure (all scenes are indoors), Henry VIII (famously an indoor production originally), Pericles, Cymbeline (designed for indoor performance) and so on. Which ones would not be especially suitable for indoors ?

Henry V, or anything with large scale battle scenes and "excursions". For that you need a venue where smoke effects can disperse and with space for combatants to run about.




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