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Will The Programme Ripoff Ever End?


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#21 Haz

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:38 AM

View PostOliverT, on 13 December 2012 - 09:57 PM, said:

There has not been one reply that has even been close to being on point. The question is: When ticket prices are as high as in New York, why are Londoners, unlike New Yorkers, willing to pay up to an additional 4 quid for a slight brochure full of adverts?

Because there is no other option.

If I had the choice between a tatty free Playbill or paying £4 for a programme (or even, £10 for a 'souvenir brochure') then I'd go with the Playbill. For me, I get programmes because I find it useful to be able to look back and see who I've seen in what (my programmes all have scribbles on to show where I've seen understudies / alternates).

So, as no-one is giving me the option of a free Playbill here, I choose to spend £4 on a programme, because I'd rather that than nothing.
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#22 vickster51

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:46 PM

I'm not a Broadway expert but based on my experience this year I do not find London as expensive. I'm a regular theatregoer, mainly in London, and haven't paid over the 40-50 range more than twice this year (and that was for last minute purchases for musicals). In fact most of my tickets are a lot less than this too, possibly as I know where the discounts are. In comparison, I saw 2 shows in New York this year, one cost me $131 (including fees) and the other $123 (including fees). Exchange rates are slightly different now but this was still a lot more than I normally pay for theatre. So I still think London theatre is a lot more affordable.

That aside, I'd say the Playbills are not good quality, in terms of paper and content and quite frankly should be free! Yes some London programmes are poor and overpriced, but others are interesting, informative and useful aids to a production. I too like to have a collection so will continue to buy them, so ultimately it's a personal choice for the individual theatregoer.



#23 robg

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 11:55 AM

very interesting topic i agree with many on here i too used to buy a programme every show i went ot i have 27 blood brothers ones  but all with different casts and great to  look back and see actors returning years later etc ... recently with a prices going up and lack of content as well as space ive reduced buying them , i only buy one if its a show i really want to see  or want to know more about the production ... saying that have you noticed a lot of touring shows now dont even have a running order of the show in it  with  act 1 ... act 2 scene one ... scene two etc very annoying esp with musicals  alot i bought recently dont even have the songs listed in order :(

#24 jaqs

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 12:00 PM

Interestingly Rock of ages has moved to a traditional programme at the garrick rather than the brochure style it had at the shaftesbury.

Ones without running orders annoy me too.

#25 Lynette

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:34 PM

That bloke in The Telegraph has a go today, basically saying same as we do on this thread. Wonder where he gets his ideas from?

#26 KevinUK

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:10 PM

I dot buy programmes as for every four or five I buy I could get a ticket to something else (obviously cheap/day seats). I get why it's business for tourists, but for someone who is a west end regular, I don't see the point - just keep your tickets and pick up one of the promotional flyers instead - takes up less room in the drawer and has less adverts!
If I stay awake, it must be good.

#27 mallardo

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:39 PM

You make sense, Kevin, but, alas, some of us are simply collectors and can't help ourselves.
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#28 KevinUK

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:39 PM

Nothing wrong with that! I did buy my first one in around five years earlier this month when I saw Viva Forever. God only knows where I've shoved it.
If I stay awake, it must be good.

#29 Coggit

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:40 PM

I personally like souvenir programmes and buy them at every show I see. I do agree that the normal programmes are somewhat overpriced considering it's usually just a copy and paste of the cast bios that is on the official websites of the shows. However, it's nice to have something to look back on years later.
2013 Theatre
[West End] Shrek****, The Phantom of the Opera***, Spamalot****,The Phantom of the Opera*****, Viva Forever*, Jersey Boys****, This House***, The Book of Mormon*****, Marinda Sings Live! ***** (Booked for: Stephen Ward, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory)
[UK Tour] The Phantom of the Opera*****, Rocky Horror Show***, Hairspray****, The 39 Steps**, The Mousetrap***, Starlight Express****, Rocky Horror Show****

#30 armadillo

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 07:11 PM

Silence from the OP...




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