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Trelawny Of The Wells - Donmar


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#21 Beth

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:13 AM

View Postfringefan, on 11 February 2013 - 09:45 AM, said:

And thank you, too, Latecomer.  As in my reply to mallardo, I am aware of and signed up to the 3 different login systems; the difficulty for me, as for everyone else, will be judging it so that I'm neither too early nor too late.  At least if I fail again this week I might make it a little further into the process which will provide useful info for the next attempt.  I wish they would give more info on the website about where to start, i.e. with the chosen date (all those in question are of course currently showing sold out), production or from the reminder e-mail or what.

Start with the Barclays Front Row Page - it just takes a while to change to the link that sends you to the ATG website.  Today it took nearly 2 minutes for the link to show up (and it felt like hours)!  They should definitely make it clearer.

Good luck for your next go!

EDIT: Keep trying today - as of 10:17, still some tickets available for 2nd.

#22 Beth

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:14 AM

View PostLatecomer, on 11 February 2013 - 10:10 AM, said:

Tickets for 2nd March evening!

Me too! ;-)

#23 AnnieInTheStalls

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:14 AM

I've not done it before and was unsure which page to start on, but a link appeared on the Front Row page (where the countdown is) and it was easy from there.

#24 Latecomer

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:17 AM

I think ticket link still up!
http://buy.atgtickets.com/5/17/17/

#25 fringefan

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:21 PM

Thank you al for your suggestions.  I did wonder whether to start from the Front Row page but didn't want to risk waiting for something to happen there - of which there was no sign despite the counter reaching zero - only to find all the tix had been snaffled up elsewhere.  Shame, as a free Saturday is like gold-dust to me - I won't have another until April.

#26 Nicholas

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:15 PM

Will standing tickets still available on the door for this?

#27 popcultureboy

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:35 AM

Standing tickets are listed on the seating plan with the price of £7.50, but no info as to when they will actually be sold.

#28 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:48 AM

On the day of the performance, from 10.30am at the box office, I presume.



#29 Lynette

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 11:06 PM

Well to be honest if you don't get tix for this, do not despair. I was going to post just 'meh' but I will add a few points. Ok, only the second performance so a couple of glitches to sort out, lines crossing and tripping over a prop...The production lot were in there tonight scribbling away in notebooks. The play is about acting and theatre and the changes to same in the nineteenth century towards a more naturalistic presentation. Fashions change in theatre as one of the characters notes but basically acting has moved from grand gestures to 'real life'. Nice ideas, worth an outing. but here something def lost. I don't know what Patrick Marber is supposed to have done to the original text  but it wasn't enough. I think he cut it a bit but someone with his skills could have done much more. It had several flat places and very few laughs. I did laugh out loud once when the meek granddaughter is horrified by her husband's misdeal at whist.

The last twenty minutes were directorially 'school play'. I noticed that the director Joe Wright is a distinguished film director but sorting out a load of characters on a stage all at the same time is obviously a different thing. People all over the place and not in a good place. Key last lines swallowed and masked...a pity cos the actors as usual were giving it their all. Ron Cook as usual doing his best. He doubled [ theatrical landlady and severe grandfather ] as did several of the others. Not sure it added any depth.
Lighting poor, should be sharper and sound odd - some of the actors looked like they had mikes on [o why ?]

The interval was fascinating: they raised a large heavy panel up into the heavens. And several pretty stage hands lugged heavy furniture on and off.

#30 Nicholas

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

Perhaps it’s because I had enough cough sweets to tranquilise an elephant, but I felt more positively about it (if you're going I'm sure you'll enjoy it but yes, if you didn't get tickets don't worry).  It’s light as a feather and forgettable won’t be an unfair way to describe it, but I enjoyed it at the time.  I preferred it to The Magistrate – better (and fewer) songs, better play - but less laugh out loud funny and not hugely more memorable.  The play, to me, seemed to be like four one act plays with the same characters - Act I was a comedy about theatrical types, Act II a class comedy, Act III suddenly had Konstantin from The Seagull expostulate about a new way of theatre and Act IV was something between the class comedy and Summer Stock, "Let's Put On A Show!" (but that Irish-via-Jamaican accent - dear God...).  I can't tell if the fault is with Pinero or if Wright just didn't direct a coherent play.  All the actors were good, especially Ron Cook - agree that the doubling up didn't add depth, but he got to feature in more scenes which was a bonus.  Aimee Ffion Edwards I always enjoy watching.  It was performed and put together lovingly, and some of that rubbed off.

Make of this what you will, but I felt like I did about Peter Hall’s Twelfth Night.  Once you realise it’s a comedy that’s not really meant to make you laugh or think (Twelfth Night wasn't about characters, it was about costumes), it’s easy to relax into.  I like Joe Wright’s films – Anna Karenina made good (cinematic) use of the stage, and Hanna’s an underrated action-film-cum-fairy-tale  – but his theatrical career’s yet to ignite (actually, he did something with A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings, which I liked a great deal, more than this).  Overall I really rather enjoyed it but "lightweight" doesn't begin to describe it.  Of the people next to me, one seemed to rather enjoy it, the other kept falling asleep.  That's a critique if ever there was one.  I liked it but not enough to get excited about it.  Though it’s far from life-changing or profound or great theatre, and does fall flat a few times, I’d call it harmless fun, pleasant and enjoyable.  It's hard to stress how unremarkable yet pleasant this is.




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