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Royal Court

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#11 xanderl

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:14 AM

A surprisingly positive review in the Express!

I did enjoy his comments on Tom Stoppard and David Hare in the Standard interview. And I'd still love to know if he is related to Edgar Lustgarten.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#12 dallardice

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:18 AM

Simon Edge in the Express seems to be making a habit of being contrarian at the moment.  As Mark Shenton pointed out this morning, he wrote almost the only negative review of A Chorus Line...

#13 Honoured Guest

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 02:11 AM

It was a good Royal Court idea to pair Bruce Norris's American The Low Road with a British look at the financial system, but unfortunately I thought this feeble and disappointing. Two early scenes on "unity bonds" and a third on "shorting" attempt to set a financial context for the world of the play, but I didn't pick up all the details clearly and I felt that a stand-up comedian or sketch team could have made the same points more effectively.

The rest of the play laboriously establishes three slightly preposterous characters who eventually come together in the final scene for a dramatic denouement which seems a bit random, not entirely credible, and tangential to the play's declared theme of austerity and its favoured alternative policy option. This theme only directly appears in a very late speech delivered by Ferdy Roberts which addresses national debt and pops up out of the blue. It seems to be an authorial message and might as well have been published in an article.

The stand-out actor is Meera Syal who manages to make all her characters seem natural and credible, and funny where appropriate. I wondered if she had collaborated on writing her lines. It occurred to me that Anders Lustgarten could in future bring his expert insight to co-write with one of those several Royal Court playwrights who generally produce excellently crafted but essentially trivial plays, such as The Acid Test and NSFW.

On the political theatre horizon, I have high hopes for the NT production in The Shed of Tim Price's play on the Occupy movement, because the National Theatre Wales production last year of his play The Radicalisation of Bradley Manning was truly theatrically exciting - unlike this, in my opinion.

#14 Parsley

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 12:39 PM

Loved it!

Yes it was short and underdeveloped

But it made me think, had fantastic acting and addressed potent and relevant issues

After seeing The Audience, Quartermaine's Terms and the most execrable Trelawny all in the same week I was starting to lose hope

RC always comes up trumps!

#15 xanderl

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:58 PM

I agree with Parsley - a bit undercooked but I enjoyed it. Like NSFW it felt a bit like it needed another couple of drafts.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage





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