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The Hothouse, Trafalgar Transformed

SRB & John Simm

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#61 Alexandra

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 04:32 PM

Apologies if this has been discussed already. I want to get a couple of very good seats for this, and I'm happy to be "part of the on-stage experience" (why not just say the seats are on the stage) but according to the website I can pay either £24.50 (row AA)or £65 (row A) for that privilege. ATG's call centre has no idea what the difference is. Can anyone help please?

#62 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 05:24 PM

Another seating related question: anyone know where the dayseats are located for this?



#63 Epicoene

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 05:38 PM

View PostAlexandra, on 10 May 2013 - 04:32 PM, said:

Apologies if this has been discussed already. I want to get a couple of very good seats for this, and I'm happy to be "part of the on-stage experience" (why not just say the seats are on the stage) but according to the website I can pay either £24.50 (row AA)or £65 (row A) for that privilege. ATG's call centre has no idea what the difference is. Can anyone help please?
Go for Row A, then you have the warm glow of inner satisfaction as you survey the great unwashed in AA. It's how I always feel when seated in the Super Seats. Those prices are idiotic though, tomorrow I will have excellent seats for Public Enemy at the Young Vic for £19.50.

#64 Poly

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 05:41 PM

View PostAlexandra, on 10 May 2013 - 04:32 PM, said:

Apologies if this has been discussed already. I want to get a couple of very good seats for this, and I'm happy to be "part of the on-stage experience" (why not just say the seats are on the stage) but according to the website I can pay either £24.50 (row AA)or £65 (row A) for that privilege. ATG's call centre has no idea what the difference is. Can anyone help please?

From where I was seating (row D), AA looked on stage, A is not, it's just the front row at the same level as the actors. The seating on stage (the rows with two letters) are at the back of the stage, and generally speaking you might be seeing the back of the actors a lot. On that basis, it's cheaper but for £24.5 i think it's worth it.

Re dayseats, sorry I don't know where they are.

#65 mallardo

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:10 PM

Harold Pinter as farceur sounds strange and, on the basis of this production of The Hothouse, IS strange.  A youthful frolic (written 1958) it lacks virtually all of the Pinter trademarks.  Not only is it not terse and to the point, it is loquacious to a fault. Yes, it has its funny moments, mainly due to a hard-working cast and SRB in particular, but it all feels scattered and empty.  Programme essays strain to make a case for its retrospective importance - Guantanamo Bay is trotted out yet again - but the play itself cannot support the thesis.  It feels like Pinter made it up as he was going along and then just decided to end it.  Joe Orton did this kind of thing so much better.
Excuse me if I seem jejune
I promise I'll find my marbles soon.

#66 wickedgrin

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 06:20 AM

Quentin Letts was scathing about SRB in this in the Daily Mail.

#67 Epicoene

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 02:59 PM

View Postwickedgrin, on 11 May 2013 - 06:20 AM, said:

Quentin Letts was scathing about SRB in this in the Daily Mail.

Billington loved it of course. Has there ever been a Pinter production he gave less than 4 stars to ?


#68 Jamiem

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:32 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 11 May 2013 - 02:59 PM, said:



Billington loved it of course. Has there ever been a Pinter production he gave less than 4 stars to ?

One day he will be found out

#69 Lynette

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:34 PM

Billington or Pinter?

#70 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:42 AM

Thoroughly enjoyed this last night. It's being played for the laughs, and as Mallardo says, it does not feel like Pinter at all. Did he not intend it to be played in the way Lloyd has chosen, perhaps? I was looking at info about the last NT revival, which ran at over 2hr30. This came out last night at just gone 9.15, with interval. The delivery is incredibly snappy. No pauses here. So what I wonder is that maybe past productions have delivered it as a darker, slow-burning piece allowing it to build rather than at full blast from the off. Or maybe text has been cut for this one, but I rather doubt that.

The cast is superb. SRB, John Simm and Indira Varma give sterling performances. SRB's facial expressions are particularly marvellous, his eye popping out over his little 'tache. And to have Clive Rowe and Christoper Timothy is what are really cameo roles, is a real luxury. But the performances of the night come from John Heffernan, who gets better every time I see him, and Harry Melling. Heffernan plays Lush as this suave, slightly camp figure, dashing in a purple suit, whilst Melling's Lamb is frantic, anxious and naive, and really the emotional core of the piece. A pity, in a way, that we never see him in Act 2.

I'm getting annoyed about this whole 'Trafalgar Transformed' brand. I thought it was supposed to be a new configuration for every production etc, but it's the same as it was for Macbeth. Short for cash, maybe? The seating onstage adds nothing. It just feels like another of Lloyd's gimmicks. And the way this production has been blocked means that you're likely to see a lot of backs. Other than that, it's a great design by Soutra Gilmour. A melange of cables and wires, chilling peeling white walls, a fading portrait of the Virgin Mary on the false proscenium.

But yet again, £5 for the programme. Less that was in the Macbeth one. No production photos, not even rehearsal shots. Just a few posed cast photos and a couple of essays, the biogs and lots of adverts.

For those interested, I dayseated yesterday. Seats are mostly in the 2 boxes - view ok, need to lean a touch but your have legroom and a moveable chair. Well worth a tenner. Most people got there 9.30/9.45 ish, but talking to the person sitting next to me, there were still tix available at 11.30. And I think not all of them were sold, as there was an empty seat in my box. We moved down to the front row of the main block in the interval, as there were quite a few empty seats. Whilst we could see and hear everything from the box, it is a thrill to sit so close.






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