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The Winslow Boy

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#11 xanderl

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 12:56 AM

Can't be bothered to click a link, why not tell us what you think here?
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#12 Epicoene

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 07:46 AM

View PostLynette, on 16 March 2013 - 11:28 PM, said:


I vaguely remember the old movie of this story but had never seen the play. It is an interesting one if you don't mind a lot of talky talky and some staginess which I don't. One set which frankly was a bit of a disappointment as it is supposed to be the Edwardian home of a retired bank person and there wasn't a bit of either Edwardian stain glass or arts and craft stuff anywhere to be seen.

Well a retired Edwardian banker probably wouldn't fill his house with radical cutting-edge very niche new stuff like that would he ? His home would reflect the previous era.

David Mamet (surprisingly) directed and wrote the screenplay for an interesting film version of this one, Nigel Hawthorne in the lead - worth a look.

#13 armadillo

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 07:56 AM

Did anyone see Saturday's Pointless? What am I saying, of course you all did!

#14 Lynette

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 08:31 AM

'Well a retired Edwardian banker probably wouldn't fill his house with radical cutting-edge very niche new stuff like that would he ? His home would reflect the previous era'

Previous era was Victorian, dressing piano legs or perhaps William Morris which they did reference in the wallpaper.  As presented , this wife would be up to date and anyway, much more likely to have elaborate drapes, not ready made John Lewis - the curtains feature in the text and needed more thought -  and some stained glass in the doors or above the doors in panelling or in the main windows as a panel.  I think they missed a trick, espesh with the references to the hallway on several occasions. Would have been nice to glimpse it. To be honest this set looked like many places I know in say, Edgware today, the between the wars villa. I think they were trying to make it contemporary to the date of the play but I agree , one tends to be furnished and dressed  in the preceding age. Also the wheel chair - more effort for poor HG to get it moving than to actually walk. Thought this was daft. It might have been authentic but it distracted me. The art of a stage set of this type is to make it appear ok even if it isn't historically accurate so the audience doesn't question it. I noticed one critic, I think Charles Spencer, liked the set. So I must be wrong. ;-)

#15 Epicoene

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 09:52 AM

View Postarmadillo, on 25 March 2013 - 07:56 AM, said:

Did anyone see Saturday's Pointless? What am I saying, of course you all did!

No. I only watch the old repeats on Challenge TV as I find the quality of the show now is not what it used to be.

#16 xanderl

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 10:30 AM

View PostEpicoene, on 25 March 2013 - 07:46 AM, said:

Well a retired Edwardian banker probably wouldn't fill his house with radical cutting-edge very niche new stuff like that would he ? His home would reflect the previous era.


Agree with you on that. It's like seeing productions of (eg) Abigail's Party or Absent Friends where everything in the room is from the exact bit of the 70s in which the play is set - I remember the 70s, it wasn't like that!
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#17 armadillo

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 10:32 AM

View PostLynette, on 25 March 2013 - 08:31 AM, said:

'Well a retired Edwardian banker probably wouldn't fill his house with radical cutting-edge very niche new stuff like that would he ? His home would reflect the previous era'

Previous era was Victorian, dressing piano legs or perhaps William Morris which they did reference in the wallpaper.  As presented , this wife would be up to date and anyway, much more likely to have elaborate drapes, not ready made John Lewis - the curtains feature in the text and needed more thought -  and some stained glass in the doors or above the doors in panelling or in the main windows as a panel.  I think they missed a trick, espesh with the references to the hallway on several occasions. Would have been nice to glimpse it. To be honest this set looked like many places I know in say, Edgware today, the between the wars villa. I think they were trying to make it contemporary to the date of the play but I agree , one tends to be furnished and dressed  in the preceding age. Also the wheel chair - more effort for poor HG to get it moving than to actually walk. Thought this was daft. It might have been authentic but it distracted me. The art of a stage set of this type is to make it appear ok even if it isn't historically accurate so the audience doesn't question it. I noticed one critic, I think Charles Spencer, liked the set. So I must be wrong. ;-)
  Surely she'd have been to the newly fashionable Selfridges...

#18 VDCNI

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 10:56 AM

View Postarmadillo, on 25 March 2013 - 07:56 AM, said:

Did anyone see Saturday's Pointless? What am I saying, of course you all did!

Doctor Who and Rattigan in the same programme - the perfect evening!

Surprised Jackie King didn't mention After The Dance she I'm sure she was at the National around the same time in something.

#19 Epicoene

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 10:57 AM

View Postxanderl, on 25 March 2013 - 10:30 AM, said:

Agree with you on that. It's like seeing productions of (eg) Abigail's Party or Absent Friends where everything in the room is from the exact bit of the 70s in which the play is set - I remember the 70s, it wasn't like that!

There is another set-related irritation I notice quite often, it is set (say) in the Victorian era and they have silver candlesticks on the dresser, or someone pulls out a silver cigarette case, and in the name of authenticity they have used an actual piece from the era, all tarnished and battered, when in fact they would have been brand new bright and sparkling at the time.

#20 trafficlighttheatregoer

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

View Postxanderl, on 25 March 2013 - 12:56 AM, said:

Can't be bothered to click a link, why not tell us what you think here?

Awww, it's a wonder you ever found your way to this message board, Xanderl! ;) lol

However, I take your point that this is a discussion message board. In summary, there are some good performances but, in my opinion, energy and vitality are sapped in this unfocussed production. I do go into a lot more of the background as this is essentially a 1946 play set in Edwardian England which makes "Let Right Be Done" a very ambiguous statement. Interestingly the story was first mooted as a propaganda movie advertising English democracy (inspired though by an American piece on the case by critic Alexander Woolcott brought to Rattigan by actor couple Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne). It was rejected for a movie as too dull, Rattigan stuck by it and the rest is history. More  if you click on the link ... ;)  http://trafficlightt...boy-review.html

View Postarmadillo, on 25 March 2013 - 10:32 AM, said:

  Surely she'd have been to the newly fashionable Selfridges...

If I remember correctly it was Barkers that got the product placement in the play (for the curtains). No product placements for quiz shows as per the other postings though, although perhaps "What's My Line" would have been theatrically appropriate! But that only started in the US four years after the play was written. ;}





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