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The Winslow Boy

Old Vic

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#31 armadillo

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:17 PM

Is a 'legal present' another term for 'legal document' then? Google is not my friend here. And they glue the document onto the curtain? :blink:

#32 Honoured Guest

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:28 PM

View Posttrafficlighttheatregoer, on 25 March 2013 - 11:45 PM, said:

But what did slow down and interrupt the pace down was the dead hand of a legal present coming down like an iron curtain every now and then.

I think I may almost understand now. There was a legal document on vellum made from calfskin forehoof and it was attached to an iron safety curtain? Where did they stick the postal order?

#33 Alexandra

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 11:02 PM

Oh (or O, as Lynette would say) just go and see the show you two. The petition of right, including the famous plea "let right be done", or a document describing what it is (can't remember which), is printed or projected onto the curtain. If pretentiousness was a disqualification from posting here then half the regulars would be barred, including thee and me.

#34 Lynette

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:21 PM

The legal document is the petition of right which was an application by an individual to be allowed to sue the crown in civil proceedings. Until 1947 you had no right to bring a civil claim against the crown ie the government and the admiralty who ran the school were an arm of the crown.

Gottit?

#35 trafficlighttheatregoer

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 05:22 PM

View Postarmadillo, on 27 March 2013 - 10:17 PM, said:

Is a 'legal present' another term for 'legal document' then? Google is not my friend here. And they glue the document onto the curtain? :blink:

Yep. It was either a projection as Alexandra has said or they had a special curtain printed for the show passed no doubt by the printers' solicitors ...  - or maybe they did use a Pritt stick .... :)  But yes, go see it, and find out for yourself ...

Anyway, all this discussion has sent me back to my blog and I have slightly amended it to add more of the history and clarify so the rigorous cross examination by you all has had a result ....  for good or ill ... ;)

View PostHonoured Guest, on 27 March 2013 - 10:28 PM, said:

I think I may almost understand now. There was a legal document on vellum made from calfskin forehoof and it was attached to an iron safety curtain? Where did they stick the postal order?

I'm afraid I didn't get close enough to stroke it and find out what it was made of ... I guess in reality the Archer-Shee's must have had many suggestions as to where to stick the postal order but - it was never shown, only mentioned and the signature discussed which revealed more shenanigans within the College.

Talking of calfskin though made a link in my mind to last year when the Law Commission called for hundreds of "dead laws" to be repealed including one from the 1300s as to how animals could be seized to pay the King's debts ... http://www.independe...ed-7618201.html

MInd you, this is probably what put the final nail in the coffin for self determination for the independent state of Pimlico ;)

#36 mallardo

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 06:42 PM

Really enjoyed this.  Another fine production from Lindsay Posner with a very good cast. I don't get some of the criticism I've read of Henry Goodman who I thought superb as were Naomi Frederick and Deborah Findlay and Peter Sullivan. And special mention to Wendy Nottingham as the maid.  She really made the most of her big moment in the last act.  

I have to say I'm loving the Rattigan revival - so many good plays.  The only one that didn't work for me was Cause Celebre and it certainly wasn't bad.
Excuse me if I seem jejune
I promise I'll find my marbles soon.

#37 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 08:44 AM

This was superb. After the slight disappointment that was The Turn of the Screw, Lindsay Posner is back on form with this. A beautifully judged revival, doesn't drag at all- 3hrs flies by. And what a cast. Henry Goodman as good as ever. Can't wait to see Arturo Ui now. Deborah Findlay starts off very understated, and comes into her own when she confronts her husband. And Peter Sullivan as the barrister is pitch-perfect. On the face of it a cold and thoroughly unlikeable man, who tries to conceal any drop of emotion within him. The interrogation between him and Ronnie Winslow at the end of Act 2 is sensational. A battle of words. But the play is not so much about the Winslow Boy. It's the Winslow Girl who owns it, and whose impression stays on your mind. A girl stuck between marriage and right, who through the course of play finds herself. And Naomi Frederick does it brilliantly.



#38 wickedgrin

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:49 PM

Caught this finally on the last Sat of the run.

A very well written and constructed play based on a true case of course. Although I did feel a little lengthy and wordy in places and as all the action takes place off stage with the court case I found the devises of reading from the newspapers and people rushing in explaining what was happening "off" a little laboured.

Well acted though! I like Henry Goodman in this ( not usually a fan ) but I found his portrayal convincing as was his ageing as the case took it's toll on his health as well as his family finances.

Of course I always have quibbles. I found the set rather "contemporary" - I am sure it was very well researched as being Edwardian but it looked terribly "modern" to me. An elderly couple (50 was elderly back then) would not have gone out to buy the latest "look" and their home would have reflected an age 20/30 years previous I think.

The actor playing the "little boy" was far from little. I know 14 year old boys can be tall but for me it took away a lot of the pathos of the piece as he looked like a young man rather than a "boy", rather nullifying his being picked on by the Naval College etc.

I enjoyed this solid revival with the emphasis on "solid".

#39 Lynette

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:53 AM

At last someone agrees with me on the decor. Period decor should be taken back ten years or so or more as we don't all rush out and update every season. The point about the curtains is that the compliment  is not a true one so the curtains have to look dated. No?





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