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Passion Play


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#21 Deal J

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 09:36 AM

View PostNicholas, on 17 April 2013 - 12:25 AM, said:

The two men are good, though bizarre disjunct in haircuts - one balding, the other Heseltine.

I was reminded of your comment when I saw this yesterday, and it made me laugh - in his thoughts, he's got a thick head of hair!

I really liked the play, although towards the end of the second act I was thinking it was dragging a little and becoming a series of "things happening". Thankfully the final scene turned it around for me. I won't forget those last few images, terrific stuff.
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#22 popcultureboy

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:32 AM

Saw this last night and for the first time in 8 years, I left a show at the interval. I just couldn't take the sub par performances (Annabel Scholey and Oliver Cotton both terrible, I thought) nor could I handle the awful device of other actors delivering the stream of consciousness of the two leads. Both Teale and Wanamaker are perfectly capable of communicating everything being relentlessly narrated ALL ON THEIR OWN. I'm sure, in 1982, this looked groundbreaking. Now it looks and feels horribly dated.

#23 wickedgrin

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:20 PM

Mmmm, have to agree popcultureboy. I saw this in Brighton and was very underwhelmed. But for once I thought I would keep my opinions to myself. Why revive this piece? I thought it was very dated. The devise of two actresses playing the one part may have been "ground breaking" back in the day but now it just seemed tedious. I was bored.

#24 popcultureboy

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 04:37 PM

I really wanted Teale or Wanamaker to interrupt their alter-egos and say "yes, I can do all this with my face and body language, thanks". I loathe having things spelled out for me like that. Did some googling last night and I see that Nicola Walker played the Annabelle Scholey role in the Donmar revival back in 2000. Shame I missed that, I do love her. But I doubt even that would have been enough to salvage the play.

#25 wickedgrin

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 12:51 PM

Of course 4 star reviews from the Telegraph and the Independent. They must have seen a different play to me. Immediately receive an "offer" for this though - £57.50 top price reduced to £35 with no fees. Mon - Fri performances. Don't all rush at once now!

#26 popcultureboy

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:01 PM

The WOS review is absolutely glowing as well.

#27 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:27 PM

View Postpopcultureboy, on 07 May 2013 - 07:32 AM, said:

Saw this last night and for the first time in 8 years, I left a show at the interval. I just couldn't take the sub par performances (Annabel Scholey and Oliver Cotton both terrible, I thought) nor could I handle the awful device of other actors delivering the stream of consciousness of the two leads. Both Teale and Wanamaker are perfectly capable of communicating everything being relentlessly narrated ALL ON THEIR OWN. I'm sure, in 1982, this looked groundbreaking. Now it looks and feels horribly dated.

Billington in the Guardian says that the second act is when the show comes into its own.



#28 mallardo

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:30 PM

It's certainly when Annabel Scholey comes into her own - or comes out of it.
Excuse me if I seem jejune
I promise I'll find my marbles soon.

#29 popcultureboy

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 02:11 PM

I found Scholey's performance in the first half to be painfully stilted and wooden. The prospect of further pointless disrobing really wasn't enough to make me want to stay.

#30 Deal J

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 02:49 PM

I did enjoy the performances, I can understand why some might think the device dated but it was new to me so I found it interesting. It does drag a little in the second half, but the way the device is used for the final scene turns the whole piece into something more impressive (for me, anyway).
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