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Children Of The Sun National Theatre, London


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#1 El Peter

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 11:55 AM

Russia 1905, and revolutionary change seeming to occur. As a result of that political and social movement, writer Maxim Gorky is released from prison and sees his latest play, 'Children of the Sun', staged.

This production in London 2013 is Andrew Upton's adaptation of 'Children of the Sun'. It is worth seeing.

Just three years before in 1902, Gorky had written 'Philistines' and 'The Lower Depths'.

#2 Honoured Guest

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 11:57 AM

View PostEl Peter, on 18 April 2013 - 11:43 AM, said:

Hmmm


#3 Poly

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 12:22 PM

I loved it. It's not perfect, but some of the frustrations are inherent to the play, and what I liked (performances - Paul Higgins in particular - and staging) I absolutely loved. I want to see it again.

#4 El Peter

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 09:42 PM

Paul Higgins was good in this, wasn't he? The vet, although I cannot remember if he mentioned animals at any point! Seeing him again last week was reassuring after first noticing him at the National in Bulgakov's The White Guard two or three years ago. On that occasion I was reassured I was not the the only one in the audience who chuckled with recognition and in anticipation of how the character might sound, given that only recently Higgins had been on television playing press officer Jamie, swearing like a trooper and blurting out "Motherwell Rules!" in The Thick of It. He showed he could do more than that.

#5 Alexandra

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 10:27 PM

Paul Higgins is always very good. I'd like to see him in leading roles.

#6 Lynette

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 11:58 AM

Yes Paul Higgins good. But it isn't a very good play is it? Kinda sub Ibsen. Nice to see an urban pre revolution Russia for a change but I think like the plays of David Hare which will look less relevant in the future I think , this one might have packed a punch at the time but now it is a bit of a mush twixt melodrama and talkie talkie. Are we meant to follow all the philosophical bunk or was Gorky taking the piss? It isn't clear. Is Boris the hero of the piece or does he fail too? Not clear. Oh well, fun ending.

#7 armadillo

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 12:50 PM

If anyone wants to see rural Gorky and did see the marvellous NT production from about 15 years ago, (SRB, Roger Allam. Henry Goodman, Patricia Hodge et al), there's a LAmDA production of Summerfolk that might be of interest. And it's at a price  everyone can afford

http://www.pleasance...-by-maxim-gorky

#8 El Peter

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:47 PM

I'd love to see that, armadillo, but have agreed to do something else with others tomorrow. I have seen Lamda productions before and enjoyed them. I didn't see the Summerfolk production by NT that you refer to, very good cast involved, but did see the RSC stage it at the Aldwych Theatre in 1974, it being the first Gorky I had seen staged, and it was good.

#9 Schuttep

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:13 AM

Great play with one of the most explosive endings I've ever seen.
If I listed every show I'd seen since 1974 I'd get RSI.

Favourite Musicals: Blood Brothers; Brigadoon; Chicago; Chess; Chorus Line; Company; Evita; Follies; Godspell; Les Miserables; Little Night Music; Little Shop of Horrors; Mack and Mabel; Man of La Mancha; Merrily We Roll Along; Miss Saigon; Phantom of the Opera; Rent; Rocky Horror Show; South Pacific.

Favourite Plays: Beautiful Thing; Bent; Blithe Spirit; Cat on a Hot Tin Roof; Cherry Orchard; Dance of Death; Death of a Salesman; Endgame; Happy Days; Hedda Gabler; Henry IV (Parts I and II); Importance of Being Earnest; Little Foxes; Mother Courage; Private Lives; Shirley Valentine; Torch Song Trilogy; What the Butler Saw; Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; Wild Duck.

#10 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:40 PM

V good this. Nice play- starts off as Chekhov - nanny, samovar etc - builds up into an interesting debate on the role of science, our place in the universe. Fab acting- Geoffrey Streatfield reminded me hugely of Rafe Spall. Paul Higgins and Justine Mitchell as good as ever. The businessman- is he and his dad father and son in real life? Actors both have the same surname. And discovered 2 new great actors in Lucy Black and Emma Lowndes. And the ending is exciting, isn't it?






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