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Vicious

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#11 wickedgrin

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:30 PM

Yes, it was terribly "old fashioned" but I enjoyed it for what it was. Great to see two great actors hamming it up and having a great time. Off topic I thought Job Lot was just the Office based in a job centre - I hope Ricky Gervais is getting royalties. Plus of course so much of it was so accurate it wasn't funny.

#12 xanderl

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:03 PM

Ravenhill is interviewed in the new Radio Times - apart from coming up with a 2 page outline he wasn't involved in writing this.

Looking forward to his Radio 3 adaptation of The Octoroon.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#13 Lynette

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:48 PM

Twas Turgid.

#14 Honoured Guest

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:08 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 30 April 2013 - 11:08 AM, said:

As it contains theatrical royalty in the shape of McKellen, Jacobi and de la Tour I tought I'd start a thread on the ITV-1 sitcom offering "Vicious"

And Marcia Warren, Philip Voss and Iwan Rheon. I watched it as broadcast and thought it was a reality series like TOWIE and Made in Chelsea. It made me laugh out loud, although I thought the Frances de la Tour character was a sexist throwback to the dark ages. McKellen and Jacobi just played themselves, didn't they?

#15 Epicoene

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:36 AM

View PostCurtain Call, on 01 May 2013 - 12:06 PM, said:

Why does everything on TV or at the theatre have to involve contemporary culture- by which I presume you mean appeal to young people? Hello- but the world does not revolve around young people!

You miss my point. I am totally opposed to the pandering to yoof (and I am also opposed to young people getting discounted theatre tickets). My point was that this programme was like someone sitting down and, without any hint of irony or post-modernism, making and releasing a silent film 30 years after The Jazz Singer.

My assertion that Ravenhill had written this rubbish was based on a little resume that he himself seemed to have put out. If he is now furiously back-pedalling I'm not surprised.

By the way, best sitcom of all time, The Larry Sanders Show, no question.

#16 popcultureboy

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:20 AM

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My point was that this programme was like someone sitting down and, without any hint of irony or post-modernism, making and releasing a silent film 30 years after The Jazz Singer.

Well, The Artist was 84 years after it and that went down rather well. I know that's not *quite* what you're getting at though.

Maybe the old fashioned feel is deliberate? I can't remember the last time I watched a sitcom that had a laugh track, for starters.

#17 wickedgrin

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:50 PM

As far as I am aware the show was filmed in front of a live studio audience!

#18 popcultureboy

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:53 PM

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As far as I am aware the show was filmed in front of a live studio audience!

I'm sure it was. Laugh tracks just make me nauseous.

#19 Epicoene

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:19 PM

View Postwickedgrin, on 02 May 2013 - 12:50 PM, said:

As far as I am aware the show was filmed in front of a live studio audience!

When they explicitly say (normally for USA shows)  that "This show was filmed in front of a live studio audience" it doesn't mean that they also don't add a laugh track. When I lived in Los Angeles I used to go to TV sitcom recordings occasionally, it was an instructive experience, for example 24 minutes of air time could take longer than King Lear to film - no audience could be whipped up into a frenzy of hysteria for that length of time.

#20 Polly1

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:59 PM

View Postxanderl, on 01 May 2013 - 07:03 PM, said:

Ravenhill is interviewed in the new Radio Times - apart from coming up with a 2 page outline he wasn't involved in writing this.


A couple of years ago,  the comedy writer John Finnemore, whom many of you know from the very funny radio comedy Cabin Pressure,  wrote a show called George and Bernard Shaw,  about two middle aged gay men who had lived together for a long time,  and their female friend. A pilot was recorded starring Richard Griffiths an Robert Lindsey but never taken up. I wonder where Ravenhill got his idea from?

I thought Vicious was dreadful, btw.




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