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Vicious

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#21 armadillo

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 03:11 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 02 May 2013 - 01:19 PM, said:

When they explicitly say (normally for USA shows)  that "This show was filmed in front of a live studio audience" it doesn't mean that they also don't add a laugh track. When I lived in Los Angeles I used to go to TV sitcom recordings occasionally, it was an instructive experience, for example 24 minutes of air time could take longer than King Lear to film - no audience could be whipped up into a frenzy of hysteria for that length of time.
  I attended one of the recordings. You'd be surprised how many crazy fans Gandalf has. And there were many, many yoofs there

#22 Epicoene

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 10:04 AM

View Postarmadillo, on 02 May 2013 - 03:11 PM, said:

I attended one of the recordings. You'd be surprised how many crazy fans Gandalf has. And there were many, many yoofs there

The atmosphere must have been reminiscent of the Nuremberg rallies if the laugh track was anything to go by. I could imagine the Police Commissioner for Youth demographic would have enjoyed it, laughing AT the leads rather than WITH them. You are being a bit circumspect though, as a student of the sitcom what did you actually make of it ?

#23 armadillo

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:34 PM

For once we are at one - I thought it was a load of old tosh. And offensive too. Rape jokes? Is this 1973? And follwoing weekly revelations about what was going on in tv studios in the 70s, is that the decade we want to go back to?   And how on earth did the young guy (the episode I saw recorded made it clear  he's unemployed) get a flat in Soho?. But at a show, you are repeatedly told to laugh and  you do because otherwise you look really grumpy. The sound will be tweaked too  - if you've ever seen a radio recording where a cast member reads the credits, you'll know there's always really loud applause then so you can hardly hear them. But the applause is faded for the broadcast. I assume they can do the same thing in reverse to enhance the applause.

#24 Ian

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 07:33 PM

I gave this [Vicious] the benefit of the doubt and watched the 2nd episode last night. If the 1st was bad the 2nd was truly dire! What on earth possessed such experienced luminaries to take part in this deadly sit-com - it can't just be the money can it? The Job Lot which follows is another unfunny waste of talent.
The engine roared, the motor hissed,
And who could see that the road would twist

#25 Lynette

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:16 PM

I thought the job lot is similar to Clare in the community which is on the radio only job lot is not as funny. They seem unable to create truly believable characters. It's all in the characters, my friends. Cliched stereotypes are not funny.

#26 Epicoene

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:29 AM

View PostLynette, on 07 May 2013 - 08:16 PM, said:

Cliched stereotypes are not funny.

Oh I don't know, the Venezuelan delegation the other week in Parks and Recreation made me laugh.

Incidentally, every review I've seen of Vicious has credited Ravenhill as a writer of it, not just a co-creator. What does it say in the credits ? (I can't bring myself to actually watch it again). I was sorry to see Caitlin Moran gave it a good review, she is normally reliable and amusing but this time has let her right-on Leftie credentials overcome her critical faculties and her feminist beliefs - the depiction of a gay relationship is no doubt laudable but not when it includes attempted jokes about rape.

#27 Epicoene

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:30 AM

On laughter tracks, I think in USA what they do is record all the sudio laughter and then rearrange it afterwards, so technically it is that audience laughing, just not at the jokes you see. They do this partly to cover the fact they have to film certain scenes many times over. I was at a recording of "Roseanne" once where Joan Collins was a surprise guest. Our squeals of surprised delight were somewhat less enthusiastic after we had seen La Collins sail through the door half a dozen times until they could all remember their lines, however the version screened didn't reflect this final lukewarm smattering of acclaim for Big Joanie but rather our intial ecstatic rapture.

#28 Honoured Guest

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 10:04 AM

The top credits include: "Written & Executive Produced by Gary Janetti"

The end credits commence with: "Created by Gary Janetti and Mark Ravenhill"

That's quite clear. Obviously I don't know which "reviews" told Epi that Mark Ravenhill is a co-writer, but I'd comment that most "reviews" of television are subjective ramblings inspired by sitting in the same room as a device on which the programme is playing. The exceptions are blogs about complex, incomprehensible dramas such as The Shadow Line where the bloggers take note of every single detail. Vicious may not have attracted such devoted blog commentary as yet.

The audience soundtrack is intended to enhance the amusement of the television viewers. It's not a documentary record of the sound reaction of the live studio audience. Of course it is manipulated. This is only a problem if the television viewers perceive it to have been manipulated so as to sound unrealistic.

For many years, the BBC Radio Theatre had a keen, regular, frequent member who had a very loud, generous and distinctive laugh which often dominated the soundtrack because she liked to sit at the front, near the microphones, and to let rip with her cackling. There was much discussion about this recurring laugh on Radio 4's Feedback because many listeners recognised the laugh and cited it, wrongly, as evidence that the BBC dubbed this same laughter track on to all their comedy shows. I think the eventual outcome was that the BBC producers endeavoured to encourage her to sit as far as possible from the microphones, but you will still easily hear her on Radio 4 Extra shows such as The Burkiss Way (to Dynamic Living).

#29 xanderl

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 10:16 AM

I presume Epi is referring to pre-publicity rather than reviews - I certainly had the same impression that Ravenhill was co-writing this, I think this came from the earliest articles before production.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#30 Epicoene

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 11:52 AM

View PostHonoured Guest, on 08 May 2013 - 10:04 AM, said:

The top credits include: "Written & Executive Produced by Gary Janetti"

The end credits commence with: "Created by Gary Janetti and Mark Ravenhill"

That's quite clear. Obviously I don't know which "reviews" told Epi that Mark Ravenhill is a co-writer,

The TV reviews in the Times (there was one last Saturday) persist in this error. How could they have got it wrong ?




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