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Relatively Speaking At The Wyndhams Theatre


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#21 paultheatre

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:04 PM

Woeful.  Watch the first 15minutes and weep.  It gets better after that, but that first "scene" needs work.  And won't get it now it's opened.  Thankfully the audience forget about it as the rest of the play takes over.  Definitely one for the pensioners only (thus extra matinees).

#22 Alf

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:12 PM

Thoroughly enjoyed this the other afternoon. Although it starts slow, the pace really picks up when Kendal and Coy appear. I'm determined to see some more Ayckbourn now. More details on the blog if you fancy reading it: http://thegreatestof...g-wyndhams.html.

Also, more information on day seats. Arrived at box office at 9:50am to be fourth in line on Wednesday. Theatre was selling best available for £25, nabbed last seat on the end of the front row. After that the best available was row N of the stalls. For the evening best available was up in the grand circle.
My occasionally neglected theatre blog: http://thegreatestof...blogspot.co.uk/
Latest post: Review: 'Blithe Spirit' at the Gielgud Theatre: http://thegreatestof...theatre_10.html

#23 Epicoene

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:39 PM

View Postpaultheatre, on 25 May 2013 - 08:04 PM, said:

Definitely one for the pensioners only (thus extra matinees).

Do you think pensioners like matinees because they are mantinees, or because matinees are cheaper ? The "thus" implies the former but with a London audience I wouldn't be so sure.

#24 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:48 PM

View PostEpicoene, on 03 June 2013 - 02:39 PM, said:

Do you think pensioners like matinees because they are matinees, or because matinees are cheaper ? The "thus" implies the former but with a London audience I wouldn't be so sure.

Matinees are cheaper for pensioners because there is a special senior rate. Otherwise it's the same price. The producers could quite easily encourage pensioners to go to evening performances by having the same senior rate then.

I think they're popular with pensioners because it's the afternoon, and so easier (and thought to be safer) to travel. Lots of pensioners come in from outside of London. I know some who make a day of it- meet up with friends, have lunch, go and see a matinee and an exhibition, back home when it's still light outside. No encounter with the drunken yobs, screeching hen nights and potential stabbings on Charing Cross Road.



#25 Latecomer

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:53 PM

View PostPharaoh, on 03 June 2013 - 02:48 PM, said:





I think they're popular with pensioners because it's the afternoon, and so easier (and thought to be safer) to travel. Lots of pensioners come in from outside of London. I know some who make a day of it- meet up with friends, have lunch, go and see a matinee and an exhibition, back home when it's still light outside. No encounter with the drunken yobs, screeching hen nights and potential stabbings on Charing Cross Road.
This sounds like me too....so much more civilised when you have a way to go afterwards!

#26 VDCNI

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:03 PM

View PostPharaoh, on 03 June 2013 - 02:48 PM, said:

Matinees are cheaper for pensioners because there is a special senior rate. Otherwise it's the same price. The producers could quite easily encourage pensioners to go to evening performances by having the same senior rate then.

I think they're popular with pensioners because it's the afternoon, and so easier (and thought to be safer) to travel. Lots of pensioners come in from outside of London. I know some who make a day of it- meet up with friends, have lunch, go and see a matinee and an exhibition, back home when it's still light outside. No encounter with the drunken yobs, screeching hen nights and potential stabbings on Charing Cross Road.

I would agree with that - my Mum always goes to matinees for those very reasons.

#27 fringefan

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 04:04 AM

Saw this yesterday and it was SO much better than I expected, but, lest I seem to be damning it with faint praise, it was not only good, it was superb.  Maybe it is a matter of age of the viewer (most of the audience were indeed older), but whatever the reason, I enjoyed every moment.  I had actually seen the play twice before but this was such a good production that I revised my opinion of the play itself.  I'd be tempted to go again, but for lack of time to see everything as it is.  It probably also helped that I booked a day seat, so was in the front row and able to savour the 4 characters' facial expressions to the full.  Given that I'd felt I was taking a bit of a chance, I was very pleasantly surprised.

#28 bingomatic

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 09:38 AM

I also saw this yesterday evening.  Thoroughly enjoyed it and all four cast members were great.  If I had to pick the weakest it would have been Kara Tointon although that would be nitpicking.  She just seemed less natural compared to the other three.  Super set and an imaginative transition from bedsit to garden.

The audience was quite old and I think the play is still relevant to a younger theatre goer.  Classic British attitudes on show and great mistaken identity confusion.




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