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#21 MS1995

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:55 PM

What about walking out in the bows? I have never done it myself and don't plan to, but have seen it pop up a few times in the bad behaviour thread and wondered if people thought it was acceptable way of showing displeasure at a performance?
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#22 Carlos

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 08:56 PM

Audience’s behaviour seems to be changing. Standing ovations are now more common than they used to be. Though, to be fair, they are not yet so generalised in the West End as on Broadway, and, so far, I have only seen it being given to shows and performers that, to some extent, deserved it. I hope, however, that booing never comes back as acceptable behaviour, and that it will be frowned upon whenever it happens. I'd be mortified and probably start feeling very uneasy towards the end of any play that I thought might induce part of the audience to that kind of behaviour. It would be in my view very unfair to actors who, let's face it, most of the time don't have much of a choice regarding a job they were probably lucky enough to get. Like many others, I’m not Elizabethan; if I don’t like a show, I just applaud politely (the deserving actors) or, in extreme cases, just leave discreetly at the interval.

#23 armadillo

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 09:51 PM

View PostMS1995, on 06 May 2013 - 08:55 PM, said:

What about walking out in the bows? I have never done it myself and don't plan to, but have seen it pop up a few times in the bad behaviour thread and wondered if people thought it was acceptable way of showing displeasure at a performance?
It's never occurred to me that it's a protest - I've always assumed people have trains to catch

#24 EmiCardiff

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:06 AM

I doubt on the whole walking out is a protest-either people who have trains to catch or just can't be bothered to stay out of impoliteness.
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#25 craftymiss

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:20 AM

I would just withhold my applause if I thought a show was that bad; I've only done this once at a touring production of Aspects of Love. Totally dire. My parents went the following night and left during the interval.  I reserved any booing for panto which is acceptable.  I think it's hard enough for the actors to struggle through a duff show without the audience making it worse

#26 Coggit

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:27 AM

I've never booed. I've felt like a performance has merited it sometimes, but if I feel that way, I just don't clap. The most I've ever been tempted though, was at a performance of Phantom a few years ago with David Shannon as Phantom and Tabitha Webb as the alternate Christine. I felt both of them couldn't be bothered, both of them gave pretty bad performances - in some case they couldn't even be bothered to sing. During Music of the Night I felt like David was just talking... Tabitha, instead of hitting high notes, she would just pretend to "sob" (especially in WYWSHA - she never hit ANY of the notes, instead she sobbed her way through the song).

It was a pitiful, lazy performance and really, they deserved any boos they got. Phantom is my favourite musical, but it was an utter sham.

@Crafty, do you mean the production with David Essex? I LOVED it :o!
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#27 freckles

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 08:30 AM

I would never boo a bad performance (unless audience participation is required). I'm more likely to snigger a bit. I would never walk out mid performance either - maybe Ieave at the interval. I have often not joined in a standing ovation, I only do that if I'm really impressed, otherwise it loses its worth. My applause ranges from polite but muted to enthusiastic (with a little woop or cheer if you're lucky!)

And as for leaving during bows, have never considered that a protest either, as above assume people need to get home or want to be at the front of the queue for the loos or cloakroom.

#28 mallardo

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:22 AM

The only time I heard booing at a play was in New York a few years ago at a performance of Sly Fox, Larry Gelbart's take on Volpone.  Richard Dreyfuss was the star (at a time when he could still be bothered to act) and when his bow turn came a man near the front emitted a loud BOO.  The cast were all in a jolly mood - the show had gone well - but Dreyfuss was clearly taken aback.  I could hear him saying to the actors next to him... "A boo?  I get a boo?"  The others seemed to find it funny - not sure he did.
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#29 craftymiss

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 01:37 PM

View PostCoggit, on 07 May 2013 - 08:27 AM, said:



@Crafty, do you mean the production with David Essex? I LOVED it :o!

Yes that't the one.  Oh my how I disliked it.  David Essex appeared to be the only one trying.  Having see the OLC I felt it was very inferior.  I didn't like the lighting, sound (but then I often have issues with the sound quality at The Mayflower) or the set. We all have different takes on shows though. Sorry off topic

#30 jaqs

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 03:52 PM

View PostMS1995, on 06 May 2013 - 08:55 PM, said:

What about walking out in the bows? I have never done it myself and don't plan to, but have seen it pop up a few times in the bad behaviour thread and wondered if people thought it was acceptable way of showing displeasure at a performance?

Ive left prior to the megamix a couple of times at bad shows. Thus negating my need to boo or not clap or pitifully shake my head.




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