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Views On Going To The Stage Door


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#21 Monteverdi

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:25 PM

personally I do think it is a bit of an intrusion, but the sad thing is when a brief encounter at the stage door leads the member of the public to assume a personal bond with the performer. Worse still is the member of the public pushing to the front of the queue, without having seen the play itself. That borders on stalking.

#22 Epicoene

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:29 PM

View PostHonoured Guest, on 13 June 2013 - 04:15 PM, said:

Right, I'd never heard of Standpoint. Browsing now online, it does seem remarkably defensive and self-consciously marginalised. Could you please link here to the piece you mention? I'm intrigued to discover what type of person has expressed such an opinion.
You I assume incorrectly I read it free online rather than paying £4.94 for the hardcopy version. It is in the current edition and is written by Lionel Shriver who is moderately famous. It is an interesting piece addressing her own position as both a reader and writer: "I don't want the product contaminated even by its source of inspiration" and "These days writers are expected to fashion themselves into another product for consumption". It oes seem it is available online though: http://standpointmag...ver-big-brother

#23 Honoured Guest

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 04:54 PM

"Publicists are keen to promote authors as well as their books, ..." because this increases the public profile and the readership of the book. I agree that the downside is "contamination" of the book.

In relation to the stage door topic, I've always found it an uncomfortable experience to encounter actors and creatives in the street by chance, which often happens because I live very near a theatre which I've often attended. I'm pretty sure I was for a while wrongly assumed to be stalking one performer.

#24 Epicoene

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 06:31 PM

View PostHonoured Guest, on 13 June 2013 - 04:54 PM, said:

I've always found it an uncomfortable experience to encounter actors and creatives in the street by chance, which often happens because I live very near a theatre which I've often attended. I'm pretty sure I was for a while wrongly assumed to be stalking one performer.
I keep seeing Boris Johnson. I've seen him in the NT foyer but also randomly in the street several times. I don't live anywhere near him, or City Hall, so it is strange. My theory is that like Churchill during the war they have employed several lookalikes to go around making public appearances to raise morale.

#25 armadillo

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 06:17 AM

I work with 'the public' in my job. I absolutely *hate* meeting my clients outside my work environment and being expected to remember who they are, even though they're usually very nice. Is there really any reason to think actors might feel different?

#26 les mis lover

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 11:30 AM

View PostSteffi, on 12 June 2013 - 12:59 PM, said:

I tried to set up a "Stage Door Etiquette" last year. Just my personal opinion of how fans should behave at stage door but feel free to have a look: http://confessionsof...ge-door-no-nos/

I love your Stage Door Etiquette Steffi.
Some real valid points in there.

#27 Epicoene

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 02:11 PM

View Postarmadillo, on 14 June 2013 - 06:17 AM, said:

I work with 'the public' in my job. I absolutely *hate* meeting my clients outside my work environment and being expected to remember who they are, even though they're usually very nice. Is there really any reason to think actors might feel different?
If I see people out of context I'm often not sure who they are. I just saw someone who I knew but couldn't think why, I might therefore have spoken to them and given them the false impression I was an admirer but I realised in time it was that odd-looking Prof Brian Cox person off the TV. If it had been the real Brian Cox I might have said something.

#28 armadillo

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 03:02 PM

There's a Prof James Fox who does art on the telly now. Soon it will be the case that no BBC4 presenters are allowed to have their own names

#29 Epicoene

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 09:23 PM

View Postarmadillo, on 14 June 2013 - 03:02 PM, said:

There's a Prof James Fox who does art on the telly now. Soon it will be the case that no BBC4 presenters are allowed to have their own names

You mean there is a programme on BBC4 not presented by Dan Cruickshank ? Odd.

#30 craftymiss

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 09:08 PM

Well I went to stage door at Queens tonight to say a farewell to a performer I greatly admire.  He's not my friend but I appreciate his voice and the roles he has had in Les Miserables. I am sorry to see him leave and wanted to thank him for his performances over his time in the show. I did however stand back and wait for him to come and speak to me, unlike some women who were virtually launching themselves at stage door the instant cast members left.




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