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The Cripple Of Innishmaan

Wizard smashes it

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#41 Poly

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 07:07 PM

I don't think any of the productions so far in the Michael Grandage season would be in my best of the year list, but none of them was subpar. And he has mixed actors and plays quite daringly. The audience on Friday night was very good (at least in the stalls). Totally on board but following the play.

#42 peggs

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 07:09 PM

I'm loathe to admit it  but you might have a point, I did say a pretty similar midsummer's comment to Latecomer today, though she did point out that Midsummer's is meant to be funny.

#43 Latecomer

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 07:50 PM

I have no problem with people enjoying themselves at a play, but the person on the end of the last row of stalls just howled with laughter at the slightest thing and ruined the play for everyone around her. I think everyone within earshot was getting increasingly frustrated. I don't know if it is a cultural thing (she was American) or just an individual thing.....she also took her shoes off and curled her feet up under her. I think I may be turning into a grumpy old woman!

Bit disappointed by the play.....didn't like the revolving set which looked like Center Parcs swimming pool fake walls....thought the play spelt things out too much when we could work it out for ourselves....and despite some good performances here and there it was never going to work as more than a pantomime with this audience.....

Oh and why would you take 2 children of 5, and maybe 4 to a play with frequent swearing and themes of abuse, plus violence? And why did the front of house staff let them in? Booster seats were actually provided for some children....if they need a booster seat they should not be there!

#44 Honoured Guest

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 08:12 PM

Your American foetal hyena could well have been a young drama student, keen to display her awesome sophisticated appreciation.

About 15 years ago, for a brief period, many theatre shows suddenly had complex set designs (often extensive 3-d landscapes) built out of some new synthetic material like hard foam rubber. It was probably relatively cheap and it was very flexible, so suddenly any set was possible. However, they always looked artificial, like old-school Dr Who alien environments, and they seem to have now gone out of fashion.

#45 peggs

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 08:16 PM

though i did have to sit on my coat and jumper to see of the person ahead of me but i was at least old enough to be there

#46 peggs

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 08:27 PM

View PostHonoured Guest, on 15 June 2013 - 08:12 PM, said:

Your American foetal hyena could well have been a young drama student, keen to display her awesome sophisticated appreciation.

About 15 years ago, for a brief period, many theatre shows suddenly had complex set designs (often extensive 3-d landscapes) built out of some new synthetic material like hard foam rubber. It was probably relatively cheap and it was very flexible, so suddenly any set was possible. However, they always looked artificial, like old-school Dr Who alien environments, and they seem to have now gone out of fashion.

Well she was a stroppy one when we wanted to get out at the interval and anyone who takes off their shoes and expects to not get their feet stood on is plain daft.

mmm that does rather sound like the set.

#47 mallardo

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 09:15 PM

Speaking as an American I can categorically state that removing shoes and assuming a foetal position in the theatre is NOT a national quirk.  It is a regional one.  No doubt she was from the Midwest.
Excuse me if I seem jejune
I promise I'll find my marbles soon.

#48 Cardinal Pirelli

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 09:58 PM

That sort of laughter is usually as a result of when people don't 'get' the emotional situation.

I don't know why but I've found this to be more the case recently, not very often at all but still noteworthy. I thought it might be because our screen media is so easy to read emotionally (often amplified by musical choices) that some just don't know how to deal with ambiguity of tone, responding with the shallowest (and therefore funniest) option.

#49 shelly

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 10:21 PM

I also experienced hysterical laughter at this afternoon's matinee, which at times completely spoiled the poignancy of some scenes.  A woman behind me was also "helpfully" explaining the plot to all those around her, which didn't help my mood!!

I felt the play dragged, particularly in the second half.  Thought Daniel Radcliffe did a good job though.

#50 Lynette

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 08:17 AM

So HG, you think Jude Law will take his top off? I'd better book......





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