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#31 Rumbledoll

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 07:50 PM

I won't argue I just want to say that Howard Davies directs no rubbish and can override any authority. Someone there said earlier  that The Last of Haussmans was awful but I enjoyed it immensely. I mean it has nothing to do Rory being a brilliant actor who is on the top of his game now.

#32 Pharaoh's number 2

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 04:56 PM

I thought this was just brilliant. And heartbreaking. Best new play of the year. I can see why some would find it a bit much, or even overblown, but it touched me really profoundly. I was shaking and weeping on the tube home. And to be honest, I'm not quite sure why- the subject matter isn't something that's very personal to me, though it clearly is to Rory Kinnear. But perhaps that was why- that it was written with deep personal meaning and emotion. And that inclusion of the "quality of mercy is not strained" speech from Merchant of Venice is beautiful.

Superlative cast. Each character brought vividly to life. And Anna Calder-Marshall's grandmother is not only blessed with some of the best lines I've heard on stage in ages, but she delivers them perfectly. And yet she also carries one of the play's most devastating scenes.

Howard Davies' direction is as meticulous as usual, and the piece benefits from the intimacy and traverse staging (or at least it did from the front row). If anything, I wanted it to be more intimate. My only niggle is one which Lynette mentioned earlier: that the furniture is a bit too spread out. But that's neither here nor there when the acting, and in my view writing, is just so so good.

Little moan: I love the Bush, but the unreserved seating is a mess. They try to tell you where to sit having queued for half an hour (thanks for the tip Latecomer!) then they get you all to squish up as there are still people to get in, then various head counts, the a late group arive and want to sit together (more shuffling/moaning), then a speech telling us that there'll be no readmission so if you need the loo go now. (It's now 2.30pm, and everyone has sat down) So a few folk get up, go to the loo and then return, meaning that it doesn't start for another 5 mins. Surely putting a number on every seat would benefit everyone? (with the exception of those who book last minute but queue early)



#33 jean_hunt

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:03 AM

I was lucky enough to win tickets to this recently and am so glad I saw it - no way I could afford the £100 asking price for a ticket to the gala performance!

Though my friend and I both thought the play dipped a bit in the middle - around the point the father entered the house - and we'd both foreseen the ending, it was a very interesting piece. As someone who has experienced disability in the family - though on a far lesser scale to that Kinnear has in mind here - I thought Rory absolutely nailed the ways in which a family are affected by that (conversations, behaviours, relationships), and how odd/alienating what's normal for you can seem to others.

I was lucky enough to be there on a night they also held a Q&A. (Kenneth Cranham is quite a character!)

Agree about the unreserved seating, by the way. It's a pain in the neck and seems to cause chaos any time I've encountered it, in various venues.

#34 Honoured Guest

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:19 AM

View PostPharaoh, on 19 October 2013 - 04:56 PM, said:

My only niggle is one which Lynette mentioned earlier: that the furniture is a bit too spread out.

View Postjean_hunt, on 20 October 2013 - 12:03 AM, said:

As someone who has experienced disability in the family - though on a far lesser scale to that Kinnear has in mind here - I thought Rory absolutely nailed the ways in which a family are affected by that (conversations, behaviours, relationships), and how odd/alienating what's normal for you can seem to others.
Maybe Rory understands that families affected by disability tend to position their furniture a bit spread out, in a desparate attempt to limit the damage to it caused by their disabled members. I don't know whether he explicitly states that in the text, or whether you have all witnessed three-dimensional literary criticism.





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