Jump to content


All's Well That Ends Well

RSC

  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21 Epicoene

Epicoene

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1240 posts

Posted 01 August 2013 - 10:19 AM

View Postigb, on 01 August 2013 - 08:45 AM, said:


Thirdly, the audience.  It was nearly full, on a Wednesday, by contrast with a half-empty Hamlet on a Friday night a month or so ago.  Even the back, side rows of the upper circle had sold, albeit not quite completely.  Quite a lot of it was tourist (there was an annoying German mother and twenties-daughter pair a few seats along from me who appeared to be giving each other a running commentary in the first half, but remained silent after I spoke to them in the interval)
RST is the only place I've told someone to shut up - a Dutch couple - unfortunately as they didn't speak English they didn't understand me. All's Well as a play is thin stuff and so it encourages heavy directorial intervention - the brilliant Trevor Nunn production reimagined it as a play by Chekhov with the Countess (Peggy Ashcroft) as Ranevskaya or Arkadina. The very good NT production staged it as a literal fairytale, I remember a weird RSC one years ago which was something to do with Bonnie Prince Charlie - like Troilus and Cressida it is almost always worth seeing for that reason.

#22 xanderl

xanderl

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2099 posts

Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:17 PM

This was great. Looked pretty full.

Production made the plot nearly make sense

Costume exhibit well worth a look incidentally
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#23 Lynette

Lynette

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 5150 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:31 PM

Check in next week! Sounds good. I tried to change my tix and couldn't get anything so they must be pretty well sold out for this and it isn't a well known play.

#24 xanderl

xanderl

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2099 posts

Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:35 PM

The exhibition has different costumes for the same roles from the past decades side by side - fascinating look at changing production styles. Worth turning up a bit early to see it.
"witty ... both made me laugh but also gave me pause" - Mark Shenton, The Stage

#25 Lynette

Lynette

    Advanced Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 5150 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Posted 27 August 2013 - 10:47 PM

Yes, a good solid production but she can't help herself can she, that dancing and faux fighting which added minutes onto an already long show. Nice to see Hicks, Slinger and Waldmann in same play, all doing what they do so well.  Was thinking what a brill play for the ladies this one is, an idea that hadn't come across before and yes, the plot made understandable! Special mention Charlotte Cornwall as the Countess, a rocking performance.

Note: seats already looking shabby and worn. Wonder why they chose this cheap fabric and odd shape. I know a bit like Courtyard but a bit more luxe would have been nice. S'pose they factor in wear and tear and replacement costs.

#26 Epicoene

Epicoene

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1240 posts

Posted 28 August 2013 - 09:53 AM

View PostLynette, on 27 August 2013 - 10:47 PM, said:

Note: seats already looking shabby and worn. Wonder why they chose this cheap fabric and odd shape. I know a bit like Courtyard but a bit more luxe would have been nice. S'pose they factor in wear and tear and replacement costs.
Chosen because they look nice from the stage I assume.

At the Tobacco Factory in the foyer they had four or five sets of different seats you could try out then vote on to be used for their forthcoming redevelopment. One set was the uniquely uncomfortable ones where the seat is divided horizontally into two separate parts for no good reason at all - they are used to bad effect in the Young Vic and (I seem to remember) the Donmar too.

#27 Nicholas

Nicholas

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 331 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 06:38 PM

This is a play I knew nothing about before going in.  It's an incredibly troubling play, one with crooked morals and characters who seem unsympathetic.  My friend and I had a long conversation afterwards which was me defending it and her reacting very viscerally to the nasty characters.  We both agreed, though, that this was bloody ace as a production, being streamlined, enjoyable, troubling when meant to be troubling and not as troubling as the problem play could have been, very easy to watch and very funny at some times.  Excellently acted – Slinger's Parolles was a really great creation, starting as what I liked to call Thin Jack Thin-stalf to Waldmann’s Hal but becoming something more interesting than that.  Waldmann – who will surely be first choice to play Jude Law in a film of his life – I want to marry.  As an actor, he brought out the role’s youth and disdain for a woman and lust and what could in other hands be paradoxes as opposed to characteristics.  Joanna Horton did a very good job - romantic, sad, dedicated, convincing.  The final scene was excellent.  Minor rave from me about this.

#28 poppy7

poppy7

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 287 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 06:48 PM

View PostNicholas, on 09 September 2013 - 06:38 PM, said:

This is a play I knew nothing about before going in.  It's an incredibly troubling play, one with crooked morals and characters who seem unsympathetic.  My friend and I had a long conversation afterwards which was me defending it and her reacting very viscerally to the nasty characters.  We both agreed, though, that this was bloody ace as a production, being streamlined, enjoyable, troubling when meant to be troubling and not as troubling as the problem play could have been, very easy to watch and very funny at some times.  Excellently acted – Slinger's Parolles was a really great creation, starting as what I liked to call Thin Jack Thin-stalf to Waldmann’s Hal but becoming something more interesting than that.  Waldmann – who will surely be first choice to play Jude Law in a film of his life – I want to marry.  As an actor, he brought out the role’s youth and disdain for a woman and lust and what could in other hands be paradoxes as opposed to characteristics.  Joanna Horton did a very good job - romantic, sad, dedicated, convincing.  The final scene was excellent.  Minor rave from me about this.
It was very good, and surely some time way way way in the future, Slinger will be an amazing Falstaff. I will be first in line to see that. Slinger was the best thing about this play,after the direction, by a long shot. Waldmann will probably be Hal someday soon. Surely part of his agreeing to take Bertram was that he figured it is a bit of a trail for Hal... its coming up soon on the RSC radar and he has said he would like to do it. I was not gone on his Bertram, he was good but then in most things I have seen him in, he is good...safe... does what it says on the tin, and I have seen him in both As You and Hamlet this year and after As You the other two were always going to pale somewhat. However, he did seem to capture the fact that he was just a young idiot, not ready to settle down, who may actually have liked Helena, which obviously gives great ambiguity to the end. Will they be happy? He did all this without once ever coming across likeable.  Horton did well as Helena because if you think about it the character well she is despicable really. Well they all are despicable. In this role getting out from Nixon's shadow enabled her to spread in wings a bit. She was at times, at the night I saw it, screechy a bit and her inexperience showed a bit. I have to say though after Slinger and the direction, the thing I loved most of all was the soldiers 'BEER ME.' Just loved them.

#29 Nicholas

Nicholas

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 331 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 07:00 PM

View Postpoppy7, on 09 September 2013 - 06:48 PM, said:

It was very good, and surely some time way way way in the future Slinger will be an amazing Falstaff. I will be first in line to see that. Slinger was the best thing about this play... after the direction by a long shot. Waldmann will probably be Hal someday soon. Surely part of his agreeing to take Bertram was that it is a bit of a trail for Hal... its coming up soon on the RSC radar and he has said he would like to do it. I was not gone on his Bertram, he was good but then in most things I have seen him in he is good...safe... does what it says on the tin, and I have seen him in both As You and Hamlet this year and after As You the other two were always going to pale somewhat. Horton did well as Helena because if you think about it the character well she is despicable really. Well they all are despicable. Again it was a solid performance nothing jazzy. I have to say though after Slinger and the direction, the thing I loved most of all was the soldiers 'BEER ME.' Just loved them.

Slinger, in his torture scene (that is what it is, the childish cruelty of Hal to Falstaff is far behind), was wonderful.  That scene, because of his performance, was the best, certainly the most memorable.  As a character he was still that moustache-twirling stylised romantic/nincompoop but there was something empathetic, sympathetic and just plain pathetic about it that made it both funny when lightness invaded it and really almost heartbreaking.

Helena is despicable, and what I liked is a lot of Shakespeare's romantic characters are like her, but she's an extreme.  They fall in love and will do anything to secure that love, so Helena's very recognisable in that way and Horton played her as so.  Jessica loves Lorenzo so leaves her father and breaks all sorts of rules and emotional bonds.  Helena's extremer, I suppose an extreme version of AMND's Helena who ends up taking extremer measures.  It's a fascinating play once you start to think a teeny bit about it and this production, for me, warrants a great deal of thought.

#30 poppy7

poppy7

    Advanced Member

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 287 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 07:15 PM

View PostNicholas, on 09 September 2013 - 07:00 PM, said:

Slinger, in his torture scene (that is what it is, the childish cruelty of Hal to Falstaff is far behind), was wonderful.  That scene, because of his performance, was the best, certainly the most memorable.  As a character he was still that moustache-twirling stylised romantic/nincompoop but there was something empathetic, sympathetic and just plain pathetic about it that made it both funny when lightness invaded it and really almost heartbreaking.

Helena is despicable, and what I liked is a lot of Shakespeare's romantic characters are like her, but she's an extreme.  They fall in love and will do anything to secure that love, so Helena's very recognisable in that way and Horton played her as so.  Jessica loves Lorenzo so leaves her father and breaks all sorts of rules and emotional bonds.  Helena's extremer, I suppose an extreme version of AMND's Helena who ends up taking extremer measures.  It's a fascinating play once you start to think a teeny bit about it and this production, for me, warrants a great deal of thought.
You could never hate Parolles. Ever, he is just weak. Helena is almost a psycho, at the end I was: I know you weren't exactly a nice youth Bertram but you are a  battle scared man now, and seriously she is a stalker who raped you.





Also tagged with RSC

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users