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Landscape with Weapons


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#1 coated peanuts

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 08:39 AM

Landscape is an excellent play, wordy, interesting and very funny at times. Funniest onstage wrestling match I've ever seen.  

The acting is good, too. I didn't quite warm to Tom Hollander at the beginning but the role sat better with him the further the play progressed. Pippa Heywood was a great neurotic Sales manager and Julian Rhind-Tutt gave a good performance as the somewhat irritated but caring brother.

#2 gandalf

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 08:55 AM

QUOTE(coated peanuts @ Mar 30 2007, 09:39 AM) View Post
Landscape is an excellent play, wordy, interesting and very funny at times. Funniest onstage wrestling match I've ever seen.  

The acting is good, too. I didn't quite warm to Tom Hollander at the beginning but the role sat better with him the further the play progressed. Pippa Heywood was a great neurotic Sales manager and Julian Rhind-Tutt gave a good performance as the somewhat irritated but caring brother.



I thought it was an interesting play with some good preformances apart from Pippa Heywood. Maybe there are people out there like her but fortunately I've never met one! It is an interesting angle on war/arms industry - worth seeing.

#3 Backdrifter

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Posted 30 March 2007 - 09:28 AM

Yes I enjoyed it, though felt the 1st act was much stronger and it lost its shape a little in the 2nd act. That said, the best scenes were in the 2nd act, any of the stuff involving the Brooks character was excellent. I like Penhall's ability to write brisk, cut-and-thrust dialogue and Roger Michell clearly has the knack of directing him.

I always like it when the Cottesloe breaks away from end-staging.
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#4 plutoanddragons

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 07:07 PM

I'm seeing this production this week, looking forward to it :-) and I was wondering where the stage is.  Is it a pretty good view from anywhere in the pit like normal? And what the running time at the moment is?

Stupid question: if I'm collecting tickets for a cottesloe production do I go to the Cottesloe desk to collect them or the main NT box office bit? I normally get them sent, so I don't know. Ta

#5 armadillo

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 09:15 PM

You collect them at the Cottesloe (which has its own cloakroom if you need to leave a bag,  and a bar but no cafe).  The stage is in the middle this time with seats on either side and the actors making a great effor not to turn sideways, though the balconies are unaffected.

#6 peggs

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 10:48 AM

I liked this, I haven't seen a new modern play in a while so it made rather a nice change. I'd agree with Backdrifter that the first half is proabably the stronger of the two but yes whenever Brooks is on stage there's a real threat of menance. Solid acting, made me think perhaps more than feel but that's no bad thing. All that food did make me hungry though.

This was my first visit to the Cottesloe so was surprised and the audience layout either side of the stage, I understand the idea of the space is that they can alter is to suit productions but wondered how it has worked for other productions.

Think it finished about 9.50/9.55 on Friday, so just over 2 hours with a 15 minute interval.

Think this bit really belongs in another thread but was rather surprised by the woman who decided to ring her friends about 5 minutes before it started, she'd go 'i'm in the theatre so I thought i'd take the opportunity to call you'. Fortunately she desisted when it started.

#7 foxford

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 10:09 PM

It's absolutely excellent - the writing is fantastic, provocative and funny, the performances utterly engaging, and the direction extremely tight. There's nothing more intelligent and satisfying on the London stage at present.

#8 ellen

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 11:18 PM

QUOTE(foxford @ Apr 3 2007, 10:09 PM) View Post
It's absolutely excellent - the writing is fantastic, provocative and funny, the performances utterly engaging, and the direction extremely tight. There's nothing more intelligent and satisfying on the London stage at present.




When people who've joined the forum the very same day speak out in fulsome praise of a play, one cannot help but wonder whether they're members of the production team..


#9 armadillo

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Posted 04 April 2007 - 06:40 AM

It wasn't bad but it certainly wasn't provocative (unless you're a big fan of advanced weapons manufacture  which I suspect most of the NT audience isn't!). I would have preferred a few less long speeches about guided missile technology though - it seemed liked Penhall had done lots of research and couldn't bear to see any of it go to waste.

#10 plutoanddragons

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Posted 04 April 2007 - 09:43 PM

I enjoyed it and thought the performances were all excellent. Act two necessarily got more serious and menacing, because I was wondering after the funny first act where it could go after that. The set design could've been very boring, but I saw some well thought out touches especially in the aircraft hanger.

I would've preferred to be a bit further back to better gauge the performances overall. We were so close that we had to sweep our heads back and forth, like we were watching a grand prix, because Tom Hollander and Julian Rhind-Tutt were normally at either end of the stage arguing and talking. Why do they call the front row EE!?

It was very similar to Blue/Orange in style, (admittedly I've only seen the TV production); a small cast arguing over moral problems to the nth degree with an occasional light touch.






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