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King Lear


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#31 Emcee

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 04:13 PM

I saw this production in March while Frances was still in the production and i can easily say this is the best production i have ever seen in a theatre. Ian McKellen is an incredibly talented actor and i was simply amazed at how he played Lear. Surely he must be one of our best Shakesperian interpreters ever? I feel so lucky to have seen this performance i would love to see it again (if i can get tickets! laugh.gif).


I was wondering (just specuation).....what are the chances this production will be filmed? [ovbviously when Frances comes back] I would definatly buy it straight away! biggrin.gif



#32 David

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 02:15 PM

QUOTE(Emcee @ May 4 2007, 05:13 PM) View Post
I was wondering (just specuation).....what are the chances this production will be filmed? [ovbviously when Frances comes back] I would definatly buy it straight away! biggrin.gif


I would hazard a guess that everything at the RSC is filmed for internal archives and publicity use, but it is rare that a commercial (or any form of full length) video will become available to the public.  It would be difficult to film for general distribution, as theatre is very different from TV- I know because I've tried to video plays (amateur productions, and with high quality camera set-ups) that have seemed very good onstage, but abysmal when played back on TV. It will never be the same; that's part of the magic of theatre- it only lives on in memory (like life... but I don't want to get philosophical on a Saturday afternoon, so I'll leave it at the technical aspects!)

#33 Emcee

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 06:21 PM

Yeah....nothing seems to match the magic of the theatre.


I was thinking a special stage to studio adaptation (like they did with the Sir Ian Holm NT production of Lear).

#34 Duncan

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 11:38 PM

Germaine Greer has offered us her opinion of the production. She didn't like it much.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,,2073910,00.html

#35 Job

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 10:29 AM

Lynette, you are now officially a national theatre critic. (The Observer yesterday)

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/theatre/drama/s...2073666,00.html

I expect to see you quoted in full on the hoardings (or the 'marquee', as some cool, look-at-my-in-the-know-jargon dude had it on this board a few months back).

Job

With the ancient is wisdom; and in length of days understanding.

#36 Emcee

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 10:31 AM

The review actually isn't that bad!

She recognises Ian Mckellen's talent as an actor and also mentions the brilliant William Gaunt too (who i've seen in other productions and been equally impressed).

QUOTE
the 1,000-strong audience is composed of a minority of geriatrics who haven't got out of the theatre-going habit, and a majority of teenaged school-trippers bussed in from various grim hostelries in the environs of Stratford. Most of the members of the audience don't have English as their first language.


This made me laugh! laugh.gif Guess i'm not any of those though!

#37 Duncan

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 02:36 PM

QUOTE(Emcee @ May 7 2007, 11:31 AM) View Post
The review actually isn't that bad!

She recognises Ian Mckellen's talent as an actor and also mentions the brilliant William Gaunt too (who i've seen in other productions and been equally impressed).

QUOTE
the 1,000-strong audience is composed of a minority of geriatrics who haven't got out of the theatre-going habit, and a majority of teenaged school-trippers bussed in from various grim hostelries in the environs of Stratford. Most of the members of the audience don't have English as their first language.


This made me laugh! laugh.gif Guess i'm not any of those though!


But what immediately follows is:

"This matters less because the Royal Shakespeare Company long ago gave up simply saying the lines for mouthing, gnashing, yelling, snarling, munching, spitting, gritting, grinding, shrieking, slobbering, snapping and gobbling them. The only actor in this production who dares to speak clearly enough for the greatest metaphysical poem in the English language to make itself momentarily heard is William Gaunt as Gloucester, who, in a mere six lines of recognisable iambic pentameter, reduced this patron to tears."

She describes the production as "perverse as anything Trevor Nunn has ever done."

And of McKellen she says:

"McKellen's method has always had more to do with impersonation than interpretation. His Lear is so tottery, closer and closer to capsizing in every scene, that we watch fascinated by the wrong things."

Her parting shot: "There's no way an audience can get the point if the actors are persuaded that there isn't one."



#38 Emcee

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 04:01 PM

I suppose you could also ask about her ability as a critic.

#39 Duncan

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 07:47 PM

QUOTE(Emcee @ May 7 2007, 05:01 PM) View Post
I suppose you could also ask about her ability as a critic.


She's an academic commentator on Shakespeare rather than a theatre critic. In terms of personal reaction to the production, her opinion isn't worth more than anyone else's. She regards the play as poetry to be read aloud rather than a performance text and her opinion is coloured by that assumption.

However, on an academic level she does know her Shakespeare: she gained a Ph.d from Cambridge on Shakespeare's early comedies, she is a professor of English Literature at Warwick University and has published books on Shakespeare.

That said, she seems to have a bee in her bonnet about the RSC and about Stratford!

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1952435,00.html <-- Germaine on why RSC actors can't act

http://arts.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1854937,00.html <-- Germaine on why Stratford-Upon-Avon is the pits

#40 Emcee

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 08:07 PM

It will be interesting to see how her views relate to the main reviews when they actually come out!



People must be really dying for the reviews!  ohmy.gif




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