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King Lear


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#71 Jan Brock

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Posted 25 May 2007 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE(Alexandra @ May 25 2007, 11:17 AM) View Post
Just putting in a word for the Pit here. I've seen some productions which fitted it beautifully - Pimlott's Richard II (still the best I've seen), Attenborough's The Prisoner's Dilemna, an interesting play recently called Europe...many others.  And the main theatre is adaptable - look at what Donnellan did with it for the recent Three Sisters.  I would far rather see something in the Barbican or the Pit than in the west end. I like the Roundhouse too, but I can see it's a bit of trek for many people.


RII was the only one of that history cycle I did not see - a mistake.

Terry Hands' "Arden of Faversham" was great in the Pit - filled with mist like Antony Gormley's new installation at the Hayward Gallery.

#72 Duncan

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 11:09 AM

QUOTE(Lynette @ May 13 2007, 12:21 AM) View Post
Jan, when is Lear transferring to London? I heard it is going on a world tour and not coming to London straightaway. I would like to book tix for family if it comes to London - have had no indication from RSC publicity.



Now we know!

12 November at the New London Theatre

http://www.rsc.org.uk/press/420_5329.aspx

Members booking starts in July, public booking in September

The only worrying thing is the phrase 'limited run'.

#73 Ian

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Posted 30 May 2007 - 11:29 AM

QUOTE(Duncan @ May 30 2007, 12:09 PM) View Post
Now we know!

12 November at the New London Theatre

http://www.rsc.org.uk/press/420_5329.aspx

Members booking starts in July, public booking in September

The only worrying thing is the phrase 'limited run'.


Hmm - interesting paragraph :-

"We are also continuing our five year relationship with Cameron Mackintosh, whose theatres, including the Gielgud, Coward and Novello, have recently housed the Company’s London seasons to great box office success”.

RSC always has a limited run in London - even when they had a base there, so not too much to worry about there.

Does give the New London a 4 month gap however - and rules it out for some of the musicals rumoured to be opening in the autumn.
The engine roared, the motor hissed,
And who could see that the road would twist

#74 Jan Brock

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 12:15 PM

QUOTE(Ian @ May 30 2007, 12:29 PM) View Post
Hmm - interesting paragraph :-

"We are also continuing our five year relationship with Cameron Mackintosh, whose theatres, including the Gielgud, Coward and Novello, have recently housed the Company’s London seasons to great box office success”.

RSC always has a limited run in London - even when they had a base there, so not too much to worry about there.

Does give the New London a 4 month gap however - and rules it out for some of the musicals rumoured to be opening in the autumn.


If you stage your best productions for only four weeks each in London you ensure "great box office success" - I'd be worried if I were you - King Lear almost sold out in Stratford purely on RSC member pre-booking. You'll be OK for Seagull though.

#75 peggs

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 02:23 PM

So Jan you think if we're not members we're going to have problems getting tickets for Lear? So if we can't make it to Stratford or somewhere else abroad how exactly are we meant to see RSC productions that are popular? So is our best hope that the critics are so fed up with their wait that they slate it and then no one else wants to see it?

#76 Jan Brock

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 02:31 PM

QUOTE(peggs @ May 31 2007, 03:23 PM) View Post
So Jan you think if we're not members we're going to have problems getting tickets for Lear? So if we can't make it to Stratford or somewhere else abroad how exactly are we meant to see RSC productions that are popular? So is our best hope that the critics are so fed up with their wait that they slate it and then no one else wants to see it?


It does not matter what the critics say this time - it (Lear) will sell out in London immediately. When public booking opened for it Stratford there were some seats left, but not many. Their last good productions (eg. Much Ado) transferred to London for only 4-5 weeks each. My advice: Book early.

I have raised the issue before of how people are supposed to see RSC productions when they have very limited runs anywhere except Stratford and some obscure college in North Carolina that no-one has ever heard of and been told the train service to Stratford is excellent - so I suppose that is my answer to you.

#77 Duncan

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 07:55 AM

Guardian editorial praises Jessop and slams Nunn:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/st...2094501,00.html

#78 Jan Brock

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 09:12 AM

QUOTE(Duncan @ Jun 4 2007, 08:55 AM) View Post
Guardian editorial praises Jessop and slams Nunn:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/st...2094501,00.html


In what possible sense was the decision to postpone the opening night "mean to the public" ? Was even a single member of the public affected by the decision ?

I see now Nunn says the decision was taken by Michael Boyd - about time he said something I think.

#79 Duncan

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 10:21 AM

I suppose that delaying the press night has caused Jessop to be overlooked and thus the wider public has not been given an accurate picture of the production.

Depriving the public of a true picture of the production could be said to be a form of meanness towards them.

#80 coated peanuts

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 01:42 PM

QUOTE(Comment on article @ Jun 4 2007, 11:21 AM) View Post
From http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/st...2094501,00.html
At the Royal Court we have no funding for understudies so when, in our recent production of The Seagull, Carey Mulligan was rushed into hospital, Anna Madeley read from the text. The audience understood, enjoyed the play immensely and showed their appreciation.

I realise this is a little off-topic, but that glib description of the understudy fiasco at the Royal Court in the first comment really gets my hackles up.

I was in the audience. I did not enjoy the play, there was someone reading flatly from the script. I understood that they had no money to have understudies, I do not appreciate that they went ahead with the performance. It should have been cancelled for a few days and that's that. It was really quite bad. Yes, I clapped politely, but that's because management didn't come on stage so I could boo at them. I still wish I hadn't seen that atrocious performance. If I hadn't booked tons of things to see already, it probably would have put me off the theatre for a few months.

Back on topic: I saw both Barber and Jessop, and personally I preferred Jessop. She completely restored my faith in understudies. Maybe they should have gone with 2 pressnights, one in Stratford for the cast that would perform most of the Stratford performances, and another pressnight in Newcastle or lateron in London, so Barber can have her moment in the sun.




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